Commit 4096a682 authored by Judit Foglszinger's avatar Judit Foglszinger

copy-editing by nattie

parent c2548114
This is a way to share our personal media (photos (including raw images), videos,
etc) and other files (talk slides, documents, GPS tracks, etc) related to
DebConf with other attendees and the public, and ensure that it's all
preserved in one place.
The debconf19 repository is a way to ensure files related to DebConf are preserved in one place, and to share them with other attendees.
This includes photos (including raw images), videos, talk slides, documents, GPS tracks, and so on.
Please limit uploads to content that is legal, respectful of others,
and that it's appropriate to share with the world.
Please limit uploads to content which is legal, respectful of others,
and appropriate to share with the world.
We do not have infinite amounts of disk space, so use common sense before uploading huge files.
We do not have infinite amounts of disk space, so please use common sense before uploading huge files.
## web
......@@ -15,11 +13,11 @@ All files in the repository can be accessed via the web:
## setup
All DDs can directly push to this repository.
All Debian developers (DDs) can directly push to this repository.
Others can either open a merge request or ask any DD for commit rights.
The repository is using git lfs (git large file system).
This makes handling of big files more efficient, but requires some additional precaution,
This makes handling of big files more efficient, but requires some additional attention
when adding files to the repository.
1. you need the package git-lfs
......@@ -31,13 +29,13 @@ inside it. To do a shallow clone:
1. `$ GIT_LFS_SKIP_SMUDGE=1 git clone --config filter.lfs.smudge=true git@salsa.debian.org:debconf-team/public/share/debconf19.git`
1. `$ cd debconf19`
1. lfs files now just are stored as references. To actually fetch a file, do `git lfs fetch -I <filename>`
1. Use it mostly as if it was a normal git repository, but for adding files see below
1. lfs files are now only stored as references. To actually fetch a file, run `git lfs fetch -I <filename>`
1. Use it mostly as though it were a normal git repository. To add files, see below.
## adding files
In principle add files like you normally would in git,
but make sure that the files you add actually end up in lfs
Adding files generally works like it normally would in git.
Ensure that the files you add actually end up in lfs by
using git lfs ls-files after committing (or staging).
$ git add slides/testfile.svg
......@@ -45,10 +43,10 @@ using git lfs ls-files after committing (or staging).
$ git lfs ls-files
f2ca1bb6c7 * slides/testfile.svg
If it's not there, check if the file pattern is tracked by lfs:
If the file is not there, check whether the file pattern is tracked by lfs:
`$ git lfs track`
If it's not there, either, if it makes sense, rename the file to match one pattern
If it's not there either, if it makes sense, rename the file to match one pattern
or see git-lfs documentation (eg <https://docs.gitlab.com/ee/workflow/lfs/manage_large_binaries_with_git_lfs.html>)
on how to add your extension.
When doing so, don't forget to either commit/push .gitattributes or to include it in your merge request.
......
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