Commit e7747466 authored by Sriram Karra's avatar Sriram Karra

Doc and README updates for recent changes

- Mention the ~/.asynk/ directory stuff
- Mention the defaut sync profiles
parent 9e486688
- Created : Wed Aug 24 22:41:42 IST 2011
- Last Modified : Thu May 17 13:15:27 IST 2012
- Last Modified : Thu Jul 05 07:58:01 IST 2012
This is only a short introduction and some key points of interest. For more
details on how to use ASynK please refer to the included documentation, or the
......@@ -40,7 +40,7 @@ that website.
** Dependencies
- You need Python (tested with 2.7, try earlier versions at your
descretion)
descretion; may not work with Python 3)
- If you wish to sync to Outlook you can do that only on Windows. Further
you will need MS Outlook installed, along with a third party python
......@@ -70,5 +70,18 @@ that website.
** Usage
Refer to the documentation. You could also start with 'python asynk.py -h'
from the root directory of the downloaded source tree.
The recommended way to use ASynK is to first create your own 'sync profile'
which specifies which folders and PIM DBs you want to keep in sync. Refer
to the documentation for more details.
For the really impatient, ASynK comes with two default sync profiles that
kick in if no other profile is configured.
$ python asynk.py --op=sync [--dry-run] [--log=debug]
If you run tha that on Windows, you entire default outlook contacts folder
will get synched to My Contacts folder to Goolge Contacts. (You will be
prompted for your google username and password). On any other platform your
~/.bbdb will be synced to google.
For usage help, try "python asynk.py -h"
......@@ -514,21 +514,27 @@ state is explained in more detail in the @ref{Internals, Internals}, section.
@section @kbd{config.json}
The entire application configuration is stored as a JSON file in the root
directory of the application. It has copious comments and explanation of its
various fields, so we will only list the main configuarable parameters here,
and will just point you to the source to find out more.
The entire application configuration is stored as a JSON file, the default of
which is available as config.json in in the root directory of the
application. It has copious comments and explanation of its various fields, so
we will only list the main configuarable parameters here, and will just point
you to the source to find out more.
The first time you run ASynK, a copy of the config file is made to ~/.asynk
(which is the default per-user asynk config directory), or to a directory
specified with the @kbd{--user-dir} command line option.
It is important to note at the outset that the only way these parameters can
be configured is by hand - you need to edit the config.json file and save
it. The changes will be read and processed in the next run. In future we have
plans of implementing a html/browser interface, when we will support editing
these through that same interface so we can finally bid goodby to mucking with
json files.
be configured is by hand - you need to edit the ~/.asynk/config.json file. The
changes will be read and processed in the next run. In future we have plans of
implementing a html/browser interface, when we will support editing these
through that same interface so we can finally bid goodby to mucking with json
files.
@enumerate
@item
Location of directory containing logs
Location of directory containing logs. This should the name of a directory
relative to the ASynK user directory, which is ~/.asynk/ by default.
@cindex logging
@item
......@@ -568,7 +574,9 @@ BBDB
@enumerate
@item
Location of directory containing backup of BBDB stores
Location of directory containing backup of BBDB stores. This should the name
of a directory relative to the asynk user directory, which is ~/.asynk/ by
default.
@cindex Backup BBDB
@item
......@@ -1107,9 +1115,25 @@ specified folder.
@section Application and Sync State database: @kbd{state.json}
The profile database, and sync state is stored in a file called
@kbd{state.json} in the root directory of the application. This file does not
exist in the distribution, but is created the very first time you run ASynK,
from a file called @kbd{state.init.json} also in the same location.
@kbd{state.json}, which is stored in ~/.asynk/ root directory of the
application. This file does not exist in the distribution, but is created the
very first time you run ASynK, from a file called @kbd{state.init.json} in the
root of the ASynK source directory.
@emph{Note for older ASynK users}: Before v0.3.0 ASynK could only be executed
from the root directory of ASynK source, and the configuration files
(state.json and config.json) were read and written there itself. Starting with
v0.3.0 ASynK can be invoked from any directory, and it will start using
~/.asynk/ to read and write the configuration files.
If you have been using ASynK before v0.3.0 and have a state.json with your
sync profiles and other configurations in the ASynK source directory, you can
migrate easily by just running ASynK from its root directory once - ASynK will
identify that you have some state and config changes, and will copy your
versions to ~/.asynk/ so they are now available for subsequent runs from
anywhere. Note, however, tha once copied to ~/.asynk/ only the versions
present there will be read and written. Any changes you make to files
elsewhere will not be noticed.
@section Software Architecture
......
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