Commit 56fbf1a6 authored by David Paleino's avatar David Paleino

Imported Upstream version 1.6.0

parent 772a9333
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Copyright (C) 1994, 1995, 1996, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002 Free Software
Foundation, Inc.
This file is free documentation; the Free Software Foundation gives
unlimited permission to copy, distribute and modify it.
Basic Installation
==================
These are generic installation instructions.
The `configure' shell script attempts to guess correct values for
various system-dependent variables used during compilation. It uses
those values to create a `Makefile' in each directory of the package.
It may also create one or more `.h' files containing system-dependent
definitions. Finally, it creates a shell script `config.status' that
you can run in the future to recreate the current configuration, and a
file `config.log' containing compiler output (useful mainly for
debugging `configure').
It can also use an optional file (typically called `config.cache'
and enabled with `--cache-file=config.cache' or simply `-C') that saves
the results of its tests to speed up reconfiguring. (Caching is
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If you need to do unusual things to compile the package, please try
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`configure' by a program called `autoconf'. You only need
`configure.ac' if you want to change it or regenerate `configure' using
a newer version of `autoconf'.
The simplest way to compile this package is:
1. `cd' to the directory containing the package's source code and type
`./configure' to configure the package for your system. If you're
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`sh ./configure' instead to prevent `csh' from trying to execute
`configure' itself.
Running `configure' takes awhile. While running, it prints some
messages telling which features it is checking for.
2. Type `make' to compile the package.
3. Optionally, type `make check' to run any self-tests that come with
the package.
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all sorts of other programs in order to regenerate files that came
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Compilers and Options
=====================
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for details on some of the pertinent environment variables.
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by setting variables in the command line or in the environment. Here
is an example:
./configure CC=c89 CFLAGS=-O2 LIBS=-lposix
*Note Defining Variables::, for more details.
Compiling For Multiple Architectures
====================================
You can compile the package for more than one kind of computer at the
same time, by placing the object files for each architecture in their
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source code in the directory that `configure' is in and in `..'.
If you have to use a `make' that does not support the `VPATH'
variable, you have to compile the package for one architecture at a
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for another architecture.
Installation Names
==================
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=================
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Specifying the System Type
==========================
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`--build=TYPE' option. TYPE can either be a short name for the system
type, such as `sun4', or a canonical name which has the form:
CPU-COMPANY-SYSTEM
where SYSTEM can have one of these forms:
OS KERNEL-OS
See the file `config.sub' for the possible values of each field. If
`config.sub' isn't included in this package, then this package doesn't
need to know the machine type.
If you are _building_ compiler tools for cross-compiling, you should
use the `--target=TYPE' option to select the type of system they will
produce code for.
If you want to _use_ a cross compiler, that generates code for a
platform different from the build platform, you should specify the
"host" platform (i.e., that on which the generated programs will
eventually be run) with `--host=TYPE'.
Sharing Defaults
================
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you can create a site shell script called `config.site' that gives
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`PREFIX/etc/config.site' if it exists. Or, you can set the
`CONFIG_SITE' environment variable to the location of the site script.
A warning: not all `configure' scripts look for a site script.
Defining Variables
==================
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environment passed to `configure'. However, some packages may run
configure again during the build, and the customized values of these
variables may be lost. In order to avoid this problem, you should set
them in the `configure' command line, using `VAR=value'. For example:
./configure CC=/usr/local2/bin/gcc
will cause the specified gcc to be used as the C compiler (unless it is
overridden in the site shell script).
`configure' Invocation
======================
`configure' recognizes the following options to control how it
operates.
`--help'
`-h'
Print a summary of the options to `configure', and exit.
`--version'
`-V'
Print the version of Autoconf used to generate the `configure'
script, and exit.
`--cache-file=FILE'
Enable the cache: use and save the results of the tests in FILE,
traditionally `config.cache'. FILE defaults to `/dev/null' to
disable caching.
`--config-cache'
`-C'
Alias for `--cache-file=config.cache'.
`--quiet'
`--silent'
`-q'
Do not print messages saying which checks are being made. To
suppress all normal output, redirect it to `/dev/null' (any error
messages will still be shown).
`--srcdir=DIR'
Look for the package's source code in directory DIR. Usually
`configure' can determine that directory automatically.
`configure' also accepts some other, not widely useful, options. Run
`configure --help' for more details.
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Welcome to the GNU MAC Changer Utilities package! -*-text-*-
GNU MAC Changer
===============
This is a GNU/Linux utility for viewing/manipulating the MAC address
of network interfaces.
GNU MAC Changer is an utility that makes the maniputation of MAC
addresses of network interfaces easier.
- Web site: http://www.gnu.org/software/macchanger
- Repository: http://github.com/alobbs/macchanger
Update and new releases
=======================
http://www.gnu.org/software/macchanger
Old site: http://www.alobbs.com/macchanger
Alvaro Lopez Ortega <alvaro@alobbs.com>
\ No newline at end of file
All the best,
Alvaro Lopez Ortega <alvaro@alobbs.com>
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......@@ -15,6 +15,9 @@
/* Define to the one symbol short name of this package. */
#undef PACKAGE_TARNAME
/* Define to the home page for this package. */
#undef PACKAGE_URL
/* Define to the version of this package. */
#undef PACKAGE_VERSION
......
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AC_INIT(src/main.c)
AM_INIT_AUTOMAKE(macchanger, 1.5.0)
AM_INIT_AUTOMAKE(macchanger, 1.6.0)
m4_ifdef([AM_SILENT_RULES],[AM_SILENT_RULES([yes])])
AM_CONFIG_HEADER(config.h)
AC_SUBST(VERSION)
......@@ -7,4 +9,8 @@ AC_SUBST(VERSION)
AC_PROG_INSTALL
AC_PROG_CC
AC_OUTPUT(Makefile src/Makefile data/Makefile doc/Makefile)
AC_OUTPUT([
Makefile
src/Makefile
data/Makefile
doc/Makefile])
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info_TEXINFOS = macchanger.texi
macc_TEXINFOS = gpl.texi
dvi:
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This is macchanger.info, produced by makeinfo version 4.6 from
This is macchanger.info, produced by makeinfo version 4.13 from
macchanger.texi.
This file documents the GNU `macchanger' command for printing a
greeting message.
Copyright (C) 2003 Alvaro Lopez Ortega.
Copyright (C) 2003,2013 Alvaro Lopez Ortega.
Permission is granted to make and distribute verbatim copies of
this manual provided the copyright notice and this permission
......@@ -19,7 +19,7 @@ greeting message.
manual into another language, under the above conditions for
modified versions, except that this permission notice may be
stated in a translation approved by the Foundation.
INFO-DIR-SECTION Networking
START-INFO-DIR-ENTRY
* macchanger: (macchanger). Utility for viewing MAC address
......@@ -31,7 +31,7 @@ File: macchanger.info, Node: Top, Next: Overview, Up: (dir)
Stress
******
This manual documents MacChanger version 1.5.0, a utility for
This manual documents MacChanger version 1.6.0, a utility for
viewing/manipulating the MAC address of network interfaces.
* Menu:
......@@ -44,8 +44,8 @@ viewing/manipulating the MAC address of network interfaces.

File: macchanger.info, Node: Overview, Next: Features, Prev: Top, Up: Top
Overview of `macchanger'
************************
1 Overview of `macchanger'
**************************
The GNU `macchanger' utility helps to view and manipulate the MAC
address of network interfaces.
......@@ -53,8 +53,8 @@ address of network interfaces.

File: macchanger.info, Node: Features, Next: Invoking macchanger, Prev: Overview, Up: Top
Features
********
2 Features
**********
* Set specific MAC address of a network interface
......@@ -66,13 +66,15 @@ Features
* Set a MAC of the same kind (eg: wireless card)
* Reset MAC address to its original, permanent hardware value
* Display a vendor MAC list (today, 6200 items) to choose from

File: macchanger.info, Node: Invoking macchanger, Next: Examples, Prev: Features, Up: Top
Invoking macchanger
*******************
3 Invoking macchanger
*********************
The program accepts the following options.
......@@ -108,6 +110,10 @@ The program accepts the following options.
`--random'
Set fully random MAC address: Any kind and any vendor.
`-p'
`--permanent'
Reset MAC address to its original, permanent hardware value.
`-l'
`--list[=KEYWORD]'
Print known vendors. If a key is spefified, `macchanger' will
......@@ -122,8 +128,8 @@ The program accepts the following options.

File: macchanger.info, Node: Examples, Prev: Invoking macchanger, Up: Top
Example invocations
*******************
4 Example invocations
*********************
The simple case is that you just want change the hardware address of
the first ethernet network interface for a fully random one:
......@@ -141,10 +147,10 @@ another one of the same kind (for example, wireless):

Tag Table:
Node: Top1058
Node: Overview1461
Node: Features1691
Node: Invoking macchanger2083
Node: Examples3324
Node: Top1061
Node: Overview1464
Node: Features1698
Node: Invoking macchanger2160
Node: Examples3491

End Tag Table
......@@ -12,7 +12,7 @@
This file documents the GNU @code{macchanger} command for printing a
greeting message.
Copyright (C) 2003 Alvaro Lopez Ortega.
Copyright (C) 2003,2013 Alvaro Lopez Ortega.
@quotation
Permission is granted to make and distribute verbatim copies of
......@@ -56,13 +56,13 @@ approved by the Foundation.
@end ifnottex
This manual documents MacChanger version @value{VERSION}, a utility for
This manual documents MacChanger version @value{VERSION}, a utility for
viewing/manipulating the MAC address of network interfaces.
@menu
* Overview:: Overview of @command{macchanger}.
* Features::
* Features::
* Invoking macchanger:: How to run @command{macchanger}.
* Examples:: Some example invocations.
@end menu
......@@ -82,6 +82,7 @@ address of network interfaces.
@item Set a MAC of another vendor
@item Set another MAC of the same vendor
@item Set a MAC of the same kind (eg: wireless card)
@item Reset MAC address to its original, permanent hardware value
@item Display a vendor MAC list (today, 6200 items) to choose from
@end itemize
......@@ -136,6 +137,12 @@ Change the MAC address setting a random vendor MAC of any kind.
@cindex @code{--random}
Set fully random MAC address: Any kind and any vendor.
@item -p
@cindex @code{-p}
@itemx --permanent
@cindex @code{--permanent}
Reset MAC address to its original, permanent hardware value.
@item -l
@cindex @code{-l}
@itemx --list[=@var{keyword}]
......
@set UPDATED 4 October 2003
@set UPDATED-MONTH October 2003
@set EDITION 1.5.0
@set VERSION 1.5.0
@set UPDATED 16 March 2013
@set UPDATED-MONTH March 2013
@set EDITION 1.6.0
@set VERSION 1.6.0
@set UPDATED 4 October 2003
@set UPDATED-MONTH October 2003
@set EDITION 1.5.0
@set VERSION 1.5.0
@set UPDATED 16 March 2013
@set UPDATED-MONTH March 2013
@set EDITION 1.6.0
@set VERSION 1.6.0
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......@@ -29,11 +29,11 @@
.SH NAME
macchanger \- MAC Changer
.SH SYNOPSIS
.B macchanger
.B macchanger
.RI [ options ]
.RI device
.SH DESCRIPTION
\fBmacchanger\fP is a Linux utility for viewing/manipulating the MAC address for network interfaces.
\fBmacchanger\fP is a GNU/Linux utility for viewing/manipulating the MAC address for network interfaces.
.\" .PP
.\" It also...
.SH OPTIONS
......@@ -57,15 +57,24 @@ Set random vendor MAC of any kind.
.B \-r, \-\-random
Set fully random MAC.
.TP
.B \-p, \-\-permanent
Reset MAC address to its original, permanent hardware value.
.TP
.B \-l, \-\-list[=keyword]
Print known vendors (with keyword in the vendor's description string)
.TP
.B \-m, \-\-mac XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:XX
.B \-b, \-\-bia
Pretend to be a burned-in-address. If not used, the MAC will have the locally-administered bit set.
.TP
.B \-m, \-\-mac XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:XX, \-\-mac=XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:XX
Set the MAC XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:XX
.TP
.B \-s, \-\-show
Prints the current MAC
.SH EXAMPLE
macchanger -A eth1
macchanger \-A eth1
.SH "SEE ALSO"
ifconfig (8)
.\" .BR foo (1),
.\" .BR foo (1),
.SH AUTHOR
Alvaro Lopez Ortega <alvaro@alobbs.com>.
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......@@ -5,7 +5,7 @@
* Authors:
* Alvaro Lopez Ortega <alvaro@alobbs.com>
*
* Copyright (C) 2002 Alvaro Lopez Ortega
* Copyright (C) 2002,2013 Alvaro Lopez Ortega
*
* This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or
* modify it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as
......@@ -53,6 +53,7 @@ void
mc_mac_into_string (const mac_t *mac, char *s)
{
int i;
for (i=0; i<6; i++) {
sprintf (&s[i*3], "%02x%s", mac->byte[i], i<5?":":"");
}
......@@ -60,27 +61,34 @@ mc_mac_into_string (const mac_t *mac, char *s)
void
mc_mac_random (mac_t *mac, unsigned char last_n_bytes)
mc_mac_random (mac_t *mac, unsigned char last_n_bytes, char set_bia)
{
/* The LSB of first octet can not be set. Those are musticast
* MAC addresses and not allowed for network device:
* MAC addresses and not allowed for network device:
* x1:, x3:, x5:, x7:, x9:, xB:, xD: and xF:
*/
switch (last_n_bytes) {
case 6:
mac->byte[0] = (random()%255) & 0xFE;
case 5:
/* 8th bit: Unicast / Multicast address
* 7th bit: BIA (burned-in-address) / locally-administered
*/
mac->byte[0] = (random()%255) & 0xFC;
mac->byte[1] = random()%255;
case 4:
mac->byte[2] = random()%255;
case 3:
mac->byte[3] = random()%255;
case 2:
mac->byte[4] = random()%255;
case 1:
mac->byte[5] = random()%255;
}
/* Handle the burned-in-address bit
*/
if (set_bia) {
mac->byte[0] &= ~2;
} else {
mac->byte[0] |= 2;
}
}
......@@ -88,6 +96,7 @@ int
mc_mac_equal (const mac_t *mac1, const mac_t *mac2)
{
int i;
for (i=0; i<6; i++) {
if (mac1->byte[i] != mac2->byte[i]) {
return 0;
......@@ -117,21 +126,21 @@ mc_mac_read_string (mac_t *mac, char *string)
/* Check the format */
if (strlen(string) != 17) {
fprintf (stderr, "ERROR: Incorrect format: MAC lenght is 17. %s(%d)\n", string, strlen(string));
fprintf (stderr, "[ERROR] Incorrect format: MAC length should be 17. %s(%lu)\n", string, strlen(string));
return -1;
}
for (nbyte=2; nbyte<16; nbyte+=3) {
if (string[nbyte] != ':') {
fprintf (stderr, "Incorrect format: %s\n", string);
fprintf (stderr, "[ERROR] Incorrect format: %s\n", string);
return -1;
}
}
/* Read the values */
for (nbyte=0; nbyte<6; nbyte++) {
mac->byte[nbyte] = (char) (strtoul(string+nbyte*3, 0, 16) & 0xFF);
}
return 0;
}
......@@ -5,7 +5,7 @@
* Authors:
* Alvaro Lopez Ortega <alvaro@alobbs.com>
*
* Copyright (C) 2002 Alvaro Lopez Ortega
* Copyright (C) 2002,2013 Alvaro Lopez Ortega
*
* This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or
* modify it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as
......@@ -45,7 +45,7 @@ void mc_mac_into_string (const mac_t *, char *);
int mc_mac_equal (const mac_t *, const mac_t *);
mac_t *mc_mac_dup (const mac_t *);
void mc_mac_free (mac_t *);
void mc_mac_random (mac_t *, unsigned char last_n_bytes);
void mc_mac_random (mac_t *, unsigned char last_n_bytes, char set_bia);
void mc_mac_next (mac_t *);
#endif /* __MAC_CHANGER_LISTA_H__ */
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