* docs/grub.texi (Installation): Document embedding zone. Remove

	obsolete grub-install example.
parent 6bdda8f8
2010-10-16 Vladimir Serbinenko <phcoder@gmail.com>
* docs/grub.texi (Installation): Document embedding zone. Remove
obsolete grub-install example.
2010-10-16 Szymon Janc <szymon@janc.net.pl> 2010-10-16 Szymon Janc <szymon@janc.net.pl>
* grub-core/commands/legacycfg.c (grub_cmd_legacy_kernel): * grub-core/commands/legacycfg.c (grub_cmd_legacy_kernel):
...@@ -559,6 +559,8 @@ always. Therefore, GRUB provides you with a map file called the ...@@ -559,6 +559,8 @@ always. Therefore, GRUB provides you with a map file called the
@dfn{device map}, which you must fix if it is wrong. @xref{Device @dfn{device map}, which you must fix if it is wrong. @xref{Device
map}, for more details. map}, for more details.
On BIOS platforms GRUB has to use a so called embedding zone. On msdos partition tables it's the space between MBR and first partition (called MBR gap), on GPT partition it uses a BIOS Boot Partition (a partition having type 21686148-6449-6e6f-744e656564454649). If you use GRUB on BIOS be sure to supply at least 31 KiB of embedding zone (512KiB or more recommended).
If you still do want to install GRUB under a UNIX-like OS (such If you still do want to install GRUB under a UNIX-like OS (such
as @sc{gnu}), invoke the program @command{grub-install} (@pxref{Invoking as @sc{gnu}), invoke the program @command{grub-install} (@pxref{Invoking
grub-install}) as the superuser (@dfn{root}). grub-install}) as the superuser (@dfn{root}).
...@@ -579,18 +581,6 @@ Likewise, under GNU/Hurd, this has the same effect: ...@@ -579,18 +581,6 @@ Likewise, under GNU/Hurd, this has the same effect:
# @kbd{grub-install /dev/hd0} # @kbd{grub-install /dev/hd0}
@end example @end example
If it is the first BIOS drive, this is the same as well:
@example
# @kbd{grub-install '(hd0)'}
@end example
Or you can omit the parentheses:
@example
# @kbd{grub-install hd0}
@end example
But all the above examples assume that GRUB should use images under But all the above examples assume that GRUB should use images under
the root directory. If you want GRUB to use images under a directory the root directory. If you want GRUB to use images under a directory
other than the root directory, you need to specify the option other than the root directory, you need to specify the option
...@@ -629,7 +619,6 @@ using @command{grub-install}. Don't do that, however, unless you are very ...@@ -629,7 +619,6 @@ using @command{grub-install}. Don't do that, however, unless you are very
familiar with the internals of GRUB. Installing a boot loader on a running familiar with the internals of GRUB. Installing a boot loader on a running
OS may be extremely dangerous. OS may be extremely dangerous.
@node Making a GRUB bootable CD-ROM @node Making a GRUB bootable CD-ROM
@section Making a GRUB bootable CD-ROM @section Making a GRUB bootable CD-ROM
......
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