* docs/grub.texi (Naming convention): Document new naming convention.

parent ab8ba957
2010-07-20 Vladimir Serbinenko <phcoder@gmail.com>
* docs/grub.texi (Naming convention): Document new naming convention.
2010-07-20 Vadim Solomin <vadic052@gmail.com>
2010-07-20 Colin Watson <cjwatson@ubuntu.com>
......
......@@ -444,12 +444,13 @@ disk. The number @samp{0} is the drive number, which is counted from
disk.
@example
(hd0,2)
(hd0,msdos2)
@end example
Here, @samp{hd} means it is a hard disk drive. The first integer
@samp{0} indicates the drive number, that is, the first hard disk, while
the second integer, @samp{1}, indicates the partition number (or the
@samp{0} indicates the drive number, that is, the first hard disk,
the string @samp{msdos} indicates the partition scheme, while
the second integer, @samp{2}, indicates the partition number (or the
@sc{pc} slice number in the BSD terminology). The partition numbers are
counted from @emph{one}, not from zero (as was the case in previous
versions of GRUB). This expression means the second partition of the
......@@ -457,7 +458,7 @@ first hard disk drive. In this case, GRUB uses one partition of the
disk, instead of the whole disk.
@example
(hd0,5)
(hd0,msdos5)
@end example
This specifies the first @dfn{extended partition} of the first hard disk
......@@ -466,18 +467,15 @@ counted from @samp{5}, regardless of the actual number of primary
partitions on your hard disk.
@example
(hd1,a)
(hd1,msdos1,bsd1)
@end example
This means the BSD @samp{a} partition of the second hard disk. If you
need to specify which @sc{pc} slice number should be used, use something
like this: @samp{(hd1,1,a)}. If the @sc{pc} slice number is omitted,
GRUB searches for the first @sc{pc} slice which has a BSD @samp{a}
partition.
This means the BSD @samp{a} partition on first @sc{pc} slice number
of the second hard disk.
Of course, to actually access the disks or partitions with GRUB, you
need to use the device specification in a command, like @samp{set
root=(fd0)} or @samp{parttool (hd0,3) hidden-}. To help you find out
root=(fd0)} or @samp{parttool (hd0,msdos3) hidden-}. To help you find out
which number specifies a partition you want, the GRUB command-line
(@pxref{Command-line interface}) options have argument
completion. This means that, for example, you only need to type
......@@ -501,7 +499,7 @@ Now the question is, how to specify a file? Again, consider an
example:
@example
(hd0,1)/vmlinuz
(hd0,msdos1)/vmlinuz
@end example
This specifies the file named @samp{vmlinuz}, found on the first
......
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