Commit 841a6301 authored by Scott James Remnant's avatar Scott James Remnant

dpkg (1.13.1.0.1) experimental; urgency=low

  * Bin-MU; recompile against Debian unstable, to make dselect actually
    installable.

 -- Scott James Remnant <scott@netsplit.com>  Fri, 11 Mar 2005 09:00:14 +0000
parent ac8c6923
This source diff could not be displayed because it is too large. You can view the blob instead.
The C implementation of dpkg was originally written by:
Ian Jackson <ian@chiark.greenend.org.uk>
based on the Perl implementation by:
Matt Welsh <mdw@sunsite.unc.edu>
Carl Streeter <streeter@cae.wisc.edu>
Ian Murdock <imurdock@debian.org>
It is currently maintained by:
Scott James Remnant <scott@netsplit.com>
and has previously been maintained by:
Adam Heath <doogie@brainfood.com> (2001-2003)
Wichert Akkerman <wakkerma@debian.org> (1999-2003)
Ben Collins <bcollins@debian.org> (1999-2001)
Daniel Jacobowitz <dan@debian.org> (1998)
J.H.M. Dassen (Ray) <jdassen@wi.LeidenUniv.nl> (1998)
James Troup <jjtroup@comp.brad.ac.uk> (1998)
Nils Rennebarth <nils@debian.org> (1998)
Klee Dienes <klee@debian.org> (1997)
Guy Maor <maor@ece.utexas.edu> (1997)
Heiko Schlittermann <heiko@lotte.sax.de> (1996)
Countless other people have contributed to dpkg (see THANKS) and provided
code for which they claim copyright (see debian/copyright). Many thanks
to them all.
......@@ -2,7 +2,7 @@
Version 2, June 1991
Copyright (C) 1989, 1991 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
675 Mass Ave, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
59 Temple Place, Suite 330, Boston, MA 02111-1307 USA
Everyone is permitted to copy and distribute verbatim copies
of this license document, but changing it is not allowed.
......@@ -279,7 +279,7 @@ POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES.
END OF TERMS AND CONDITIONS
Appendix: How to Apply These Terms to Your New Programs
How to Apply These Terms to Your New Programs
If you develop a new program, and you want it to be of the greatest
possible use to the public, the best way to achieve this is to make it
......@@ -291,7 +291,7 @@ convey the exclusion of warranty; and each file should have at least
the "copyright" line and a pointer to where the full notice is found.
<one line to give the program's name and a brief idea of what it does.>
Copyright (C) 19yy <name of author>
Copyright (C) <year> <name of author>
This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify
it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
......@@ -305,14 +305,15 @@ the "copyright" line and a pointer to where the full notice is found.
You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
along with this program; if not, write to the Free Software
Foundation, Inc., 675 Mass Ave, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.
Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple Place, Suite 330, Boston, MA 02111-1307 USA
Also add information on how to contact you by electronic and paper mail.
If the program is interactive, make it output a short notice like this
when it starts in an interactive mode:
Gnomovision version 69, Copyright (C) 19yy name of author
Gnomovision version 69, Copyright (C) year name of author
Gnomovision comes with ABSOLUTELY NO WARRANTY; for details type `show w'.
This is free software, and you are welcome to redistribute it
under certain conditions; type `show c' for details.
......
This diff is collapsed.
Copyright (C) 1994, 1995, 1996, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002 Free Software
Foundation, Inc.
This file is free documentation; the Free Software Foundation gives
unlimited permission to copy, distribute and modify it.
Basic Installation
==================
......@@ -8,20 +14,27 @@ various system-dependent variables used during compilation. It uses
those values to create a `Makefile' in each directory of the package.
It may also create one or more `.h' files containing system-dependent
definitions. Finally, it creates a shell script `config.status' that
you can run in the future to recreate the current configuration, a file
`config.cache' that saves the results of its tests to speed up
reconfiguring, and a file `config.log' containing compiler output
(useful mainly for debugging `configure').
you can run in the future to recreate the current configuration, and a
file `config.log' containing compiler output (useful mainly for
debugging `configure').
It can also use an optional file (typically called `config.cache'
and enabled with `--cache-file=config.cache' or simply `-C') that saves
the results of its tests to speed up reconfiguring. (Caching is
disabled by default to prevent problems with accidental use of stale
cache files.)
If you need to do unusual things to compile the package, please try
to figure out how `configure' could check whether to do them, and mail
diffs or instructions to the address given in the `README' so they can
be considered for the next release. If at some point `config.cache'
contains results you don't want to keep, you may remove or edit it.
be considered for the next release. If you are using the cache, and at
some point `config.cache' contains results you don't want to keep, you
may remove or edit it.
The file `configure.in' is used to create `configure' by a program
called `autoconf'. You only need `configure.in' if you want to change
it or regenerate `configure' using a newer version of `autoconf'.
The file `configure.ac' (or `configure.in') is used to create
`configure' by a program called `autoconf'. You only need
`configure.ac' if you want to change it or regenerate `configure' using
a newer version of `autoconf'.
The simplest way to compile this package is:
......@@ -31,7 +44,7 @@ The simplest way to compile this package is:
`sh ./configure' instead to prevent `csh' from trying to execute
`configure' itself.
Running `configure' takes a while. While running, it prints some
Running `configure' takes awhile. While running, it prints some
messages telling which features it is checking for.
2. Type `make' to compile the package.
......@@ -55,14 +68,16 @@ Compilers and Options
=====================
Some systems require unusual options for compilation or linking that
the `configure' script does not know about. You can give `configure'
initial values for variables by setting them in the environment. Using
a Bourne-compatible shell, you can do that on the command line like
this:
CC=c89 CFLAGS=-O2 LIBS=-lposix ./configure
the `configure' script does not know about. Run `./configure --help'
for details on some of the pertinent environment variables.
You can give `configure' initial values for configuration parameters
by setting variables in the command line or in the environment. Here
is an example:
Or on systems that have the `env' program, you can do it like this:
env CPPFLAGS=-I/usr/local/include LDFLAGS=-s ./configure
./configure CC=c89 CFLAGS=-O2 LIBS=-lposix
*Note Defining Variables::, for more details.
Compiling For Multiple Architectures
====================================
......@@ -75,11 +90,11 @@ directory where you want the object files and executables to go and run
the `configure' script. `configure' automatically checks for the
source code in the directory that `configure' is in and in `..'.
If you have to use a `make' that does not supports the `VPATH'
variable, you have to compile the package for one architecture at a time
in the source code directory. After you have installed the package for
one architecture, use `make distclean' before reconfiguring for another
architecture.
If you have to use a `make' that does not support the `VPATH'
variable, you have to compile the package for one architecture at a
time in the source code directory. After you have installed the
package for one architecture, use `make distclean' before reconfiguring
for another architecture.
Installation Names
==================
......@@ -95,6 +110,11 @@ give `configure' the option `--exec-prefix=PATH', the package will use
PATH as the prefix for installing programs and libraries.
Documentation and other data files will still use the regular prefix.
In addition, if you use an unusual directory layout you can give
options like `--bindir=PATH' to specify different values for particular
kinds of files. Run `configure --help' for a list of the directories
you can set and what kinds of files go in them.
If the package supports it, you can cause programs to be installed
with an extra prefix or suffix on their names by giving `configure' the
option `--program-prefix=PREFIX' or `--program-suffix=SUFFIX'.
......@@ -117,22 +137,32 @@ you can use the `configure' options `--x-includes=DIR' and
Specifying the System Type
==========================
There may be some features `configure' can not figure out
automatically, but needs to determine by the type of host the package
will run on. Usually `configure' can figure that out, but if it prints
a message saying it can not guess the host type, give it the
`--host=TYPE' option. TYPE can either be a short name for the system
type, such as `sun4', or a canonical name with three fields:
There may be some features `configure' cannot figure out
automatically, but needs to determine by the type of machine the package
will run on. Usually, assuming the package is built to be run on the
_same_ architectures, `configure' can figure that out, but if it prints
a message saying it cannot guess the machine type, give it the
`--build=TYPE' option. TYPE can either be a short name for the system
type, such as `sun4', or a canonical name which has the form:
CPU-COMPANY-SYSTEM
See the file `config.sub' for the possible values of each field. If
where SYSTEM can have one of these forms:
OS KERNEL-OS
See the file `config.sub' for the possible values of each field. If
`config.sub' isn't included in this package, then this package doesn't
need to know the host type.
need to know the machine type.
If you are building compiler tools for cross-compiling, you can also
If you are _building_ compiler tools for cross-compiling, you should
use the `--target=TYPE' option to select the type of system they will
produce code for and the `--build=TYPE' option to select the type of
system on which you are compiling the package.
produce code for.
If you want to _use_ a cross compiler, that generates code for a
platform different from the build platform, you should specify the
"host" platform (i.e., that on which the generated programs will
eventually be run) with `--host=TYPE'.
Sharing Defaults
================
......@@ -145,32 +175,55 @@ default values for variables like `CC', `cache_file', and `prefix'.
`CONFIG_SITE' environment variable to the location of the site script.
A warning: not all `configure' scripts look for a site script.
Operation Controls
Defining Variables
==================
Variables not defined in a site shell script can be set in the
environment passed to `configure'. However, some packages may run
configure again during the build, and the customized values of these
variables may be lost. In order to avoid this problem, you should set
them in the `configure' command line, using `VAR=value'. For example:
./configure CC=/usr/local2/bin/gcc
will cause the specified gcc to be used as the C compiler (unless it is
overridden in the site shell script).
`configure' Invocation
======================
`configure' recognizes the following options to control how it
operates.
`--cache-file=FILE'
Use and save the results of the tests in FILE instead of
`./config.cache'. Set FILE to `/dev/null' to disable caching, for
debugging `configure'.
`--help'
`-h'
Print a summary of the options to `configure', and exit.
`--version'
`-V'
Print the version of Autoconf used to generate the `configure'
script, and exit.
`--cache-file=FILE'
Enable the cache: use and save the results of the tests in FILE,
traditionally `config.cache'. FILE defaults to `/dev/null' to
disable caching.
`--config-cache'
`-C'
Alias for `--cache-file=config.cache'.
`--quiet'
`--silent'
`-q'
Do not print messages saying which checks are being made.
Do not print messages saying which checks are being made. To
suppress all normal output, redirect it to `/dev/null' (any error
messages will still be shown).
`--srcdir=DIR'
Look for the package's source code in directory DIR. Usually
`configure' can determine that directory automatically.
`--version'
Print the version of Autoconf used to generate the `configure'
script, and exit.
`configure' also accepts some other, not widely useful, options.
`configure' also accepts some other, not widely useful, options. Run
`configure --help' for more details.
## Process this file with automake to produce Makefile.in
if WITH_DSELECT
MAYBE_DSELECT = dselect
endif
SUBDIRS = \
intl \
getopt \
lib \
src \
$(MAYBE_DSELECT) \
dpkg-deb \
dpkg-split \
utils \
scripts \
po \
methods \
origins \
man
ACLOCAL_AMFLAGS = -I m4
dist_pkgdata_DATA = archtable
EXTRA_DIST = \
debian/changelog \
debian/compat \
debian/control \
debian/copyright \
debian/dpkg-dev.install \
debian/dpkg.cfg \
debian/dpkg.docs \
debian/dpkg.install \
debian/dpkg.postinst \
debian/dpkg.postrm \
debian/dpkg.preinst \
debian/dpkg.prerm \
debian/dselect.cfg \
debian/dselect.install \
debian/pseudo-tags \
debian/rules \
debian/shlibs.default \
debian/shlibs.override
GAIN_ROOT_COMMAND=fakeroot
TARGET_ARGS=
DPKG_BUILDPACKAGE_ARGS=
LINTIAN_ARGS=
package: distdir
cd $(distdir) && dpkg-buildpackage \
-r$(GAIN_ROOT_COMMAND) \
$(TARGET_ARGS) $(DPKG_BUILDPACKAGE_ARGS)
$(am__remove_distdir)
@set -e; \
if test "x$(TARGET_ARGS)" = "x-S"; then \
arch=source; \
else \
arch=`dpkg-architecture $(TARGET_ARGS) -qDEB_HOST_ARCH`; \
fi; \
changes=$(PACKAGE)_$(VERSION)_$$arch.changes; \
test -f $$changes || { echo $$changes missing; exit 1;}; \
if which lintian >/dev/null; then \
echo lintian $(LINTIAN_ARGS) $$changes; \
lintian $(LINTIAN_ARGS) $$changes || true; \
fi; \
(echo "$(distdir) package files ready for upload: "; \
echo $$changes; \
sed -e '1,/^Files:/d;/^$$/,$$d;s/.* //g' $$changes) | \
sed -e '1{h;s/./=/g;p;x;}' -e '$${p;x;}'
# What are we building anyway?
PACKAGE = @PACKAGE@
VERSION = @VERSION@
# Directory settings
prefix = @prefix@
exec_prefix = $(prefix)
sharedir = $(prefix)/share
docdir = $(sharedir)/doc/$(PACKAGE)
copyingfile = $(docdir)/copyright
infodir = @infodir@
datadir = @datadir@
localedir = $(datadir)/locale
bindir = @bindir@
sbindir = @sbindir@
libdir = @libdir@
dpkglibdir = $(libdir)/$(PACKAGE)
dpkgsharedir = $(sharedir)/$(PACKAGE)
methodsdir = $(dpkglibdir)/methods
parsechangelogdir = $(dpkglibdir)/parsechangelog
admindir = @admindir@
mandir = @mandir@
man1dir = $(mandir)/man1
man5dir = $(mandir)/man5
man8dir = $(mandir)/man8
sysconfdir = @sysconfdir@
dpkgconfdir = $(sysconfdir)/$(PACKAGE)
alternativesdir = $(sysconfdir)/alternatives
abs_builddir = @abs_builddir@
abs_top_srcdir = @abs_top_srcdir@
ifeq ($(strip $(srcdir)),$(strip $(top_srcdir)))
subdir =
else
subdir = $(patsubst $(top_srcdir)/%,%,$(srcdir))/
endif
PERL = @PERL@
mkinstalldirs = $(SHELL) $(top_srcdir)/mkinstalldirs
LN = @LN_S@
INSTALL = @INSTALL@
INSTALL_PROGRAM = @INSTALL_PROGRAM@
INSTALL_DATA = @INSTALL_DATA@
INSTALL_SCRIPT = @INSTALL_SCRIPT@
SED = @SED@
RM = @RM@
CC = @CC@
CFLAGS = @CFLAGS@ @CWARNS@
CXX = @CXX@
CXXFLAGS = @CXXFLAGS@
CPPFLAGS = @CPPFLAGS@
LD = @LD@
LDFLAGS = @LDFLAGS@ -L../lib -L../optlib
LIBS = @LIBS@ -ldpkg -lopt $(ZLIB_LIBS) $(BZ2LIB_LIBS)
RANLIB = @RANLIB@
DEFS = @DEFS@ -D_GNU_SOURCE
INCLUDE_CFLAGS = -I$(top_srcdir)/include -I$(top_srcdir) -I$(srcdir) -I../include -I.. -I. -I$(top_srcdir)/optlib
NLS_CFLAGS = -DLOCALEDIR=\"$(localedir)\" -I$(top_srcdir)/intl -I../intl
NLS_LIBS = @INTLLIBS@
SSD_LIBS = @SSD_LIBS@
CURSES_LIBS = @CURSES_LIBS@
ZLIB_CFLAGS = @ZLIB_CFLAGS@
ZLIB_LIBS = @ZLIB_LIBS@
ZLIB_LIBS_ALSO_STATIC = @ZLIB_LIBS_ALSO_STATIC@
BZ2LIB_CFLAGS = @BZ2LIB_CFLAGS@
BZ2LIB_LIBS = @BZ2LIB_LIBS@
BZ2LIB_LIBS_ALSO_STATIC = @BZ2LIB_LIBS_ALSO_STATIC@
ALL_CFLAGS = $(CPPFLAGS) $(CFLAGS) $(DEFS) $(NLS_CFLAGS) $(INCLUDE_CFLAGS) $(ZLIB_CFLAGS) $(BZ2LIB_CFLAGS)
ALL_CXXFLAGS = $(ALL_CFLAGS) $(CXXFLAGS)
ALSO_STATIC = @ALSO_STATIC@
.c.o:
$(CC) $(ALL_CFLAGS) -c $<
.cc.o:
$(CXX) $(ALL_CXXFLAGS) -c $<
Makefile: $(srcdir)/Makefile.in
(cd $(abs_builddir);CONFIG_FILES=$(subdir)$@ $(abs_builddir)/config.status)
foobar:
@echo "srcdir='$(srcdir)'"
@echo "subdir='$(subdir)'"
This diff is collapsed.
See debian/changelog for major changes between dpkg releases.
This is dpkg, Debian's package maintenance system.
The primary interface for the dpkg suite is the `dselect' program;
a more low-level and less user-friendly interface is available in
the form of the `dpkg' command.
This diff is collapsed.
# This file contains a table of known architecture strings, with
# things to map them to.
# This file contains the table of known architecture strings.
#
# Column 1 contains the $target_cpu-$target_os string as determined
# by configure.
# Column 2 contains the Debian architecture string, which is
# returned by `dpkg --print-installation-architecture'.
# Column 3 is returned by `dpkg --print-architecture'.
# Column 1 is determined by dpkg's configure script based on the output
# of the config.guess script.
# Column 2 contains the Debian name for the architecture, which is returned
# by ‘dpkg --print-installation-architecture’.
#
# <cpu-os> <Debian name>
i386-linux i386
ia64-linux ia64
alpha-linux alpha
x86_64-linux amd64
arm-linux arm
hppa-linux hppa
m32r-linux m32r
m68k-linux m68k
mips-linux mips
mipsel-linux mipsel
powerpc-linux powerpc
s390-linux s390
s390x-linux s390x
sh3-linux sh3
sh3eb-linux sh3eb
sh4-linux sh4
sh4eb-linux sh4eb
sparc-linux sparc
i386-linux-gnu i386 i486
i486-linux-gnu i386 i486
i586-linux-gnu i386 i486
i686-linux-gnu i386 i486
pentium-linux-gnu i386 i486
sparc-linux-gnu sparc sparc
sparc64-linux-gnu sparc sparc
alpha-linux-gnu alpha alpha
alphaev4-linux-gnu alpha alpha
alphaev5-linux-gnu alpha alpha
alphaev56-linux-gnu alpha alpha
alphapca56-linux-gnu alpha alpha
alphaev6-linux-gnu alpha alpha
alphaev67-linux-gnu alpha alpha
alphaev68-linux-gnu alpha alpha
m68k-linux-gnu m68k m68k
arm-linux-gnu arm arm
armv3l-linux-gnu arm arm
armv4l-linux-gnu arm arm
ppc-linux-gnu powerpc powerpc
powerpc-linux-gnu powerpc powerpc
powerpc powerpc powerpc
mips-linux-gnu mips mips
mipsel-linux-gnu mipsel mipsel
mipseb-linux-gnu mips mips
i386-gnu hurd-i386 undefined
i386-gnu0.2 hurd-i386 undefined
i386-gnu0.3 hurd-i386 undefined
i486-gnu0.3 hurd-i386 undefined
i586-gnu0.3 hurd-i386 undefined
i686-gnu0.3 hurd-i386 undefined
ia64-linux-gnu ia64 ia64
ia64-unknown-linux ia64 ia64
ia64-unknown-linux-gnu ia64 ia64
x86_64-linux-gnu amd64 x86_64
sh3-linux-gnu sh3 sh3
sh4-linux-gnu sh4 sh4
sh3eb-linux-gnu sh3eb sh3eb
sh4eb-linux-gnu sh4eb sh4eb
hppa-linux-gnu hppa hppa
hppa1.1-linux-gnu hppa hppa
hppa2.0-linux-gnu hppa hppa
hppa64-linux-gnu hppa hppa
i386-freebsd freebsd-i386 freebsd-i386
i386-kfreebsd-gnu kfreebsd-i386 kfreebsd-i386
i386-netbsdelf-gnu netbsd-i386 netbsd-i386
i386-knetbsd-gnu knetbsd-i386 knetbsd-i386
s390-linux-gnu s390 s390
s390-ibm-linux-gnu s390 s390
s390-unknown-linux-gnu s390 s390
i386-openbsd openbsd-i386 openbsd-i386
i386-unknown-openbsd openbsd-i386 openbsd-i386
powerpc-darwin darwin-powerpc darwin-powerpc
i386-darwin darwin-i386 darwin-i386
s390x-linux-gnu s390x s390x
s390x-ibm-linux-gnu s390x s390x
s390x-unknown-linux-gnu s390x s390x
i386-darwin darwin-i386
powerpc-darwin darwin-powerpc
i386-freebsd freebsd-i386
i386-gnu hurd-i386
i386-kfreebsd-gnu kfreebsd-i386
x86_64-kfreebsd-gnu kfreebsd-amd64
i386-knetbsd-gnu knetbsd-i386
i386-netbsd netbsd-i386
i386-openbsd openbsd-i386
dnl DPKG_CACHED_TRY_COMPILE(<description>,<cachevar>,<include>,<program>,<ifyes>,<ifno>)
AC_DEFUN(DPKG_CACHED_TRY_COMPILE,[
AC_MSG_CHECKING($1)
AC_CACHE_VAL($2,[