New upstream version 0.8.2+debian1

parent 744076c6
language: go
go:
- 1.3
- 1.4
- 1.5
- 1.6
- tip
Copyright (c) 2012 Dave Grijalva
Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of this software and associated documentation files (the "Software"), to deal in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:
The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software.
THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE.
## Migration Guide from v2 -> v3
Version 3 adds several new, frequently requested features. To do so, it introduces a few breaking changes. We've worked to keep these as minimal as possible. This guide explains the breaking changes and how you can quickly update your code.
### `Token.Claims` is now an interface type
The most requested feature from the 2.0 verison of this library was the ability to provide a custom type to the JSON parser for claims. This was implemented by introducing a new interface, `Claims`, to replace `map[string]interface{}`. We also included two concrete implementations of `Claims`: `MapClaims` and `StandardClaims`.
`MapClaims` is an alias for `map[string]interface{}` with built in validation behavior. It is the default claims type when using `Parse`. The usage is unchanged except you must type cast the claims property.
The old example for parsing a token looked like this..
```go
if token, err := jwt.Parse(tokenString, keyLookupFunc); err == nil {
fmt.Printf("Token for user %v expires %v", token.Claims["user"], token.Claims["exp"])
}
```
is now directly mapped to...
```go
if token, err := jwt.Parse(tokenString, keyLookupFunc); err == nil {
claims := token.Claims.(jwt.MapClaims)
fmt.Printf("Token for user %v expires %v", claims["user"], claims["exp"])
}
```
`StandardClaims` is designed to be embedded in your custom type. You can supply a custom claims type with the new `ParseWithClaims` function. Here's an example of using a custom claims type.
```go
type MyCustomClaims struct {
User string
*StandardClaims
}
if token, err := jwt.ParseWithClaims(tokenString, &MyCustomClaims{}, keyLookupFunc); err == nil {
claims := token.Claims.(*MyCustomClaims)
fmt.Printf("Token for user %v expires %v", claims.User, claims.StandardClaims.ExpiresAt)
}
```
### `ParseFromRequest` has been moved
To keep this library focused on the tokens without becoming overburdened with complex request processing logic, `ParseFromRequest` and its new companion `ParseFromRequestWithClaims` have been moved to a subpackage, `request`. The method signatues have also been augmented to receive a new argument: `Extractor`.
`Extractors` do the work of picking the token string out of a request. The interface is simple and composable.
This simple parsing example:
```go
if token, err := jwt.ParseFromRequest(tokenString, req, keyLookupFunc); err == nil {
fmt.Printf("Token for user %v expires %v", token.Claims["user"], token.Claims["exp"])
}
```
is directly mapped to:
```go
if token, err := request.ParseFromRequest(tokenString, request.OAuth2Extractor, req, keyLookupFunc); err == nil {
fmt.Printf("Token for user %v expires %v", token.Claims["user"], token.Claims["exp"])
}
```
There are several concrete `Extractor` types provided for your convenience:
* `HeaderExtractor` will search a list of headers until one contains content.
* `ArgumentExtractor` will search a list of keys in request query and form arguments until one contains content.
* `MultiExtractor` will try a list of `Extractors` in order until one returns content.
* `AuthorizationHeaderExtractor` will look in the `Authorization` header for a `Bearer` token.
* `OAuth2Extractor` searches the places an OAuth2 token would be specified (per the spec): `Authorization` header and `access_token` argument
* `PostExtractionFilter` wraps an `Extractor`, allowing you to process the content before it's parsed. A simple example is stripping the `Bearer ` text from a header
### RSA signing methods no longer accept `[]byte` keys
Due to a [critical vulnerability](https://auth0.com/blog/2015/03/31/critical-vulnerabilities-in-json-web-token-libraries/), we've decided the convenience of accepting `[]byte` instead of `rsa.PublicKey` or `rsa.PrivateKey` isn't worth the risk of misuse.
To replace this behavior, we've added two helper methods: `ParseRSAPrivateKeyFromPEM(key []byte) (*rsa.PrivateKey, error)` and `ParseRSAPublicKeyFromPEM(key []byte) (*rsa.PublicKey, error)`. These are just simple helpers for unpacking PEM encoded PKCS1 and PKCS8 keys. If your keys are encoded any other way, all you need to do is convert them to the `crypto/rsa` package's types.
```go
func keyLookupFunc(*Token) (interface{}, error) {
// Don't forget to validate the alg is what you expect:
if _, ok := token.Method.(*jwt.SigningMethodRSA); !ok {
return nil, fmt.Errorf("Unexpected signing method: %v", token.Header["alg"])
}
// Look up key
key, err := lookupPublicKey(token.Header["kid"])
if err != nil {
return nil, err
}
// Unpack key from PEM encoded PKCS8
return jwt.ParseRSAPublicKeyFromPEM(key)
}
```
A [go](http://www.golang.org) (or 'golang' for search engine friendliness) implementation of [JSON Web Tokens](http://self-issued.info/docs/draft-ietf-oauth-json-web-token.html)
[![Build Status](https://travis-ci.org/dgrijalva/jwt-go.svg?branch=master)](https://travis-ci.org/dgrijalva/jwt-go)
**BREAKING CHANGES:*** Version 3.0.0 is here. It includes _a lot_ of changes including a few that break the API. We've tried to break as few things as possible, so there should just be a few type signature changes. A full list of breaking changes is available in `VERSION_HISTORY.md`. See `MIGRATION_GUIDE.md` for more information on updating your code.
**NOTICE:** A vulnerability in JWT was [recently published](https://auth0.com/blog/2015/03/31/critical-vulnerabilities-in-json-web-token-libraries/). As this library doesn't force users to validate the `alg` is what they expected, it's possible your usage is effected. There will be an update soon to remedy this, and it will likey require backwards-incompatible changes to the API. In the short term, please make sure your implementation verifies the `alg` is what you expect.
## What the heck is a JWT?
JWT.io has [a great introduction](https://jwt.io/introduction) to JSON Web Tokens.
In short, it's a signed JSON object that does something useful (for example, authentication). It's commonly used for `Bearer` tokens in Oauth 2. A token is made of three parts, separated by `.`'s. The first two parts are JSON objects, that have been [base64url](http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4648) encoded. The last part is the signature, encoded the same way.
The first part is called the header. It contains the necessary information for verifying the last part, the signature. For example, which encryption method was used for signing and what key was used.
The part in the middle is the interesting bit. It's called the Claims and contains the actual stuff you care about. Refer to [the RFC](http://self-issued.info/docs/draft-jones-json-web-token.html) for information about reserved keys and the proper way to add your own.
## What's in the box?
This library supports the parsing and verification as well as the generation and signing of JWTs. Current supported signing algorithms are HMAC SHA, RSA, RSA-PSS, and ECDSA, though hooks are present for adding your own.
## Examples
See [the project documentation](https://godoc.org/github.com/dgrijalva/jwt-go) for examples of usage:
* [Simple example of parsing and validating a token](https://godoc.org/github.com/dgrijalva/jwt-go#example_Parse_hmac)
* [Simple example of building and signing a token](https://godoc.org/github.com/dgrijalva/jwt-go#example_New_hmac)
* [Directory of Examples](https://godoc.org/github.com/dgrijalva/jwt-go#pkg-examples)
## Extensions
This library publishes all the necessary components for adding your own signing methods. Simply implement the `SigningMethod` interface and register a factory method using `RegisterSigningMethod`.
Here's an example of an extension that integrates with the Google App Engine signing tools: https://github.com/someone1/gcp-jwt-go
## Compliance
This library was last reviewed to comply with [RTF 7519](http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc7519) dated May 2015 with a few notable differences:
* In order to protect against accidental use of [Unsecured JWTs](http://self-issued.info/docs/draft-ietf-oauth-json-web-token.html#UnsecuredJWT), tokens using `alg=none` will only be accepted if the constant `jwt.UnsafeAllowNoneSignatureType` is provided as the key.
## Project Status & Versioning
This library is considered production ready. Feedback and feature requests are appreciated. The API should be considered stable. There should be very few backwards-incompatible changes outside of major version updates (and only with good reason).
This project uses [Semantic Versioning 2.0.0](http://semver.org). Accepted pull requests will land on `master`. Periodically, versions will be tagged from `master`. You can find all the releases on [the project releases page](https://github.com/dgrijalva/jwt-go/releases).
While we try to make it obvious when we make breaking changes, there isn't a great mechanism for pushing announcements out to users. You may want to use this alternative package include: `gopkg.in/dgrijalva/jwt-go.v2`. It will do the right thing WRT semantic versioning.
## Usage Tips
### Signing vs Encryption
A token is simply a JSON object that is signed by its author. this tells you exactly two things about the data:
* The author of the token was in the possession of the signing secret
* The data has not been modified since it was signed
It's important to know that JWT does not provide encryption, which means anyone who has access to the token can read its contents. If you need to protect (encrypt) the data, there is a companion spec, `JWE`, that provides this functionality. JWE is currently outside the scope of this library.
### Choosing a Signing Method
There are several signing methods available, and you should probably take the time to learn about the various options before choosing one. The principal design decision is most likely going to be symmetric vs asymmetric.
Symmetric signing methods, such as HSA, use only a single secret. This is probably the simplest signing method to use since any `[]byte` can be used as a valid secret. They are also slightly computationally faster to use, though this rarely is enough to matter. Symmetric signing methods work the best when both producers and consumers of tokens are trusted, or even the same system. Since the same secret is used to both sign and validate tokens, you can't easily distribute the key for validation.
Asymmetric signing methods, such as RSA, use different keys for signing and verifying tokens. This makes it possible to produce tokens with a private key, and allow any consumer to access the public key for verification.
### JWT and OAuth
It's worth mentioning that OAuth and JWT are not the same thing. A JWT token is simply a signed JSON object. It can be used anywhere such a thing is useful. There is some confusion, though, as JWT is the most common type of bearer token used in OAuth2 authentication.
Without going too far down the rabbit hole, here's a description of the interaction of these technologies:
* OAuth is a protocol for allowing an identity provider to be separate from the service a user is logging in to. For example, whenever you use Facebook to log into a different service (Yelp, Spotify, etc), you are using OAuth.
* OAuth defines several options for passing around authentication data. One popular method is called a "bearer token". A bearer token is simply a string that _should_ only be held by an authenticated user. Thus, simply presenting this token proves your identity. You can probably derive from here why a JWT might make a good bearer token.
* Because bearer tokens are used for authentication, it's important they're kept secret. This is why transactions that use bearer tokens typically happen over SSL.
## More
Documentation can be found [on godoc.org](http://godoc.org/github.com/dgrijalva/jwt-go).
The command line utility included in this project (cmd/jwt) provides a straightforward example of token creation and parsing as well as a useful tool for debugging your own integration. You'll also find several implementation examples in to documentation.
## `jwt-go` Version History
#### 3.0.0
* **Compatibility Breaking Changes**: See MIGRATION_GUIDE.md for tips on updating your code
* Dropped support for `[]byte` keys when using RSA signing methods. This convenience feature could contribute to security vulnerabilities involving mismatched key types with signing methods.
* `ParseFromRequest` has been moved to `request` subpackage and usage has changed
* The `Claims` property on `Token` is now type `Claims` instead of `map[string]interface{}`. The default value is type `MapClaims`, which is an alias to `map[string]interface{}`. This makes it possible to use a custom type when decoding claims.
* Other Additions and Changes
* Added `Claims` interface type to allow users to decode the claims into a custom type
* Added `ParseWithClaims`, which takes a third argument of type `Claims`. Use this function instead of `Parse` if you have a custom type you'd like to decode into.
* Dramatically improved the functionality and flexibility of `ParseFromRequest`, which is now in the `request` subpackage
* Added `ParseFromRequestWithClaims` which is the `FromRequest` equivalent of `ParseWithClaims`
* Added new interface type `Extractor`, which is used for extracting JWT strings from http requests. Used with `ParseFromRequest` and `ParseFromRequestWithClaims`.
* Added several new, more specific, validation errors to error type bitmask
* Moved examples from README to executable example files
* Signing method registry is now thread safe
* Added new property to `ValidationError`, which contains the raw error returned by calls made by parse/verify (such as those returned by keyfunc or json parser)
#### 2.7.0
This will likely be the last backwards compatible release before 3.0.0, excluding essential bug fixes.
* Added new option `-show` to the `jwt` command that will just output the decoded token without verifying
* Error text for expired tokens includes how long it's been expired
* Fixed incorrect error returned from `ParseRSAPublicKeyFromPEM`
* Documentation updates
#### 2.6.0
* Exposed inner error within ValidationError
* Fixed validation errors when using UseJSONNumber flag
* Added several unit tests
#### 2.5.0
* Added support for signing method none. You shouldn't use this. The API tries to make this clear.
* Updated/fixed some documentation
* Added more helpful error message when trying to parse tokens that begin with `BEARER `
#### 2.4.0
* Added new type, Parser, to allow for configuration of various parsing parameters
* You can now specify a list of valid signing methods. Anything outside this set will be rejected.
* You can now opt to use the `json.Number` type instead of `float64` when parsing token JSON
* Added support for [Travis CI](https://travis-ci.org/dgrijalva/jwt-go)
* Fixed some bugs with ECDSA parsing
#### 2.3.0
* Added support for ECDSA signing methods
* Added support for RSA PSS signing methods (requires go v1.4)
#### 2.2.0
* Gracefully handle a `nil` `Keyfunc` being passed to `Parse`. Result will now be the parsed token and an error, instead of a panic.
#### 2.1.0
Backwards compatible API change that was missed in 2.0.0.
* The `SignedString` method on `Token` now takes `interface{}` instead of `[]byte`
#### 2.0.0
There were two major reasons for breaking backwards compatibility with this update. The first was a refactor required to expand the width of the RSA and HMAC-SHA signing implementations. There will likely be no required code changes to support this change.
The second update, while unfortunately requiring a small change in integration, is required to open up this library to other signing methods. Not all keys used for all signing methods have a single standard on-disk representation. Requiring `[]byte` as the type for all keys proved too limiting. Additionally, this implementation allows for pre-parsed tokens to be reused, which might matter in an application that parses a high volume of tokens with a small set of keys. Backwards compatibilty has been maintained for passing `[]byte` to the RSA signing methods, but they will also accept `*rsa.PublicKey` and `*rsa.PrivateKey`.
It is likely the only integration change required here will be to change `func(t *jwt.Token) ([]byte, error)` to `func(t *jwt.Token) (interface{}, error)` when calling `Parse`.
* **Compatibility Breaking Changes**
* `SigningMethodHS256` is now `*SigningMethodHMAC` instead of `type struct`
* `SigningMethodRS256` is now `*SigningMethodRSA` instead of `type struct`
* `KeyFunc` now returns `interface{}` instead of `[]byte`
* `SigningMethod.Sign` now takes `interface{}` instead of `[]byte` for the key
* `SigningMethod.Verify` now takes `interface{}` instead of `[]byte` for the key
* Renamed type `SigningMethodHS256` to `SigningMethodHMAC`. Specific sizes are now just instances of this type.
* Added public package global `SigningMethodHS256`
* Added public package global `SigningMethodHS384`
* Added public package global `SigningMethodHS512`
* Renamed type `SigningMethodRS256` to `SigningMethodRSA`. Specific sizes are now just instances of this type.
* Added public package global `SigningMethodRS256`
* Added public package global `SigningMethodRS384`
* Added public package global `SigningMethodRS512`
* Moved sample private key for HMAC tests from an inline value to a file on disk. Value is unchanged.
* Refactored the RSA implementation to be easier to read
* Exposed helper methods `ParseRSAPrivateKeyFromPEM` and `ParseRSAPublicKeyFromPEM`
#### 1.0.2
* Fixed bug in parsing public keys from certificates
* Added more tests around the parsing of keys for RS256
* Code refactoring in RS256 implementation. No functional changes
#### 1.0.1
* Fixed panic if RS256 signing method was passed an invalid key
#### 1.0.0
* First versioned release
* API stabilized
* Supports creating, signing, parsing, and validating JWT tokens
* Supports RS256 and HS256 signing methods
\ No newline at end of file
package jwt
import (
"crypto/subtle"
"fmt"
"time"
)
// For a type to be a Claims object, it must just have a Valid method that determines
// if the token is invalid for any supported reason
type Claims interface {
Valid() error
}
// Structured version of Claims Section, as referenced at
// https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc7519#section-4.1
// See examples for how to use this with your own claim types
type StandardClaims struct {
Audience string `json:"aud,omitempty"`
ExpiresAt int64 `json:"exp,omitempty"`
Id string `json:"jti,omitempty"`
IssuedAt int64 `json:"iat,omitempty"`
Issuer string `json:"iss,omitempty"`
NotBefore int64 `json:"nbf,omitempty"`
Subject string `json:"sub,omitempty"`
}
// Validates time based claims "exp, iat, nbf".
// There is no accounting for clock skew.
// As well, if any of the above claims are not in the token, it will still
// be considered a valid claim.
func (c StandardClaims) Valid() error {
vErr := new(ValidationError)
now := TimeFunc().Unix()
// The claims below are optional, by default, so if they are set to the
// default value in Go, let's not fail the verification for them.
if c.VerifyExpiresAt(now, false) == false {
delta := time.Unix(now, 0).Sub(time.Unix(c.ExpiresAt, 0))
vErr.Inner = fmt.Errorf("token is expired by %v", delta)
vErr.Errors |= ValidationErrorExpired
}
if c.VerifyIssuedAt(now, false) == false {
vErr.Inner = fmt.Errorf("Token used before issued")
vErr.Errors |= ValidationErrorIssuedAt
}
if c.VerifyNotBefore(now, false) == false {
vErr.Inner = fmt.Errorf("token is not valid yet")
vErr.Errors |= ValidationErrorNotValidYet
}
if vErr.valid() {
return nil
}
return vErr
}
// Compares the aud claim against cmp.
// If required is false, this method will return true if the value matches or is unset
func (c *StandardClaims) VerifyAudience(cmp string, req bool) bool {
return verifyAud(c.Audience, cmp, req)
}
// Compares the exp claim against cmp.
// If required is false, this method will return true if the value matches or is unset
func (c *StandardClaims) VerifyExpiresAt(cmp int64, req bool) bool {
return verifyExp(c.ExpiresAt, cmp, req)
}
// Compares the iat claim against cmp.
// If required is false, this method will return true if the value matches or is unset
func (c *StandardClaims) VerifyIssuedAt(cmp int64, req bool) bool {
return verifyIat(c.IssuedAt, cmp, req)
}
// Compares the iss claim against cmp.
// If required is false, this method will return true if the value matches or is unset
func (c *StandardClaims) VerifyIssuer(cmp string, req bool) bool {
return verifyIss(c.Issuer, cmp, req)
}
// Compares the nbf claim against cmp.
// If required is false, this method will return true if the value matches or is unset
func (c *StandardClaims) VerifyNotBefore(cmp int64, req bool) bool {
return verifyNbf(c.NotBefore, cmp, req)
}
// ----- helpers
func verifyAud(aud string, cmp string, required bool) bool {
if aud == "" {
return !required
}
if subtle.ConstantTimeCompare([]byte(aud), []byte(cmp)) != 0 {
return true
} else {
return false
}
}
func verifyExp(exp int64, now int64, required bool) bool {
if exp == 0 {
return !required
}
return now <= exp
}
func verifyIat(iat int64, now int64, required bool) bool {
if iat == 0 {
return !required
}
return now >= iat
}
func verifyIss(iss string, cmp string, required bool) bool {
if iss == "" {
return !required
}
if subtle.ConstantTimeCompare([]byte(iss), []byte(cmp)) != 0 {
return true
} else {
return false
}
}
func verifyNbf(nbf int64, now int64, required bool) bool {
if nbf == 0 {
return !required
}
return now >= nbf
}
// Package jwt is a Go implementation of JSON Web Tokens: http://self-issued.info/docs/draft-jones-json-web-token.html
//
// See README.md for more info.
package jwt
package jwt
import (
"crypto"
"crypto/ecdsa"
"crypto/rand"
"errors"
"math/big"
)
var (
// Sadly this is missing from crypto/ecdsa compared to crypto/rsa
ErrECDSAVerification = errors.New("crypto/ecdsa: verification error")
)
// Implements the ECDSA family of signing methods signing methods
type SigningMethodECDSA struct {
Name string
Hash crypto.Hash
KeySize int
CurveBits int
}
// Specific instances for EC256 and company
var (
SigningMethodES256 *SigningMethodECDSA
SigningMethodES384 *SigningMethodECDSA
SigningMethodES512 *SigningMethodECDSA
)
func init() {
// ES256
SigningMethodES256 = &SigningMethodECDSA{"ES256", crypto.SHA256, 32, 256}
RegisterSigningMethod(SigningMethodES256.Alg(), func() SigningMethod {
return SigningMethodES256
})
// ES384
SigningMethodES384 = &SigningMethodECDSA{"ES384", crypto.SHA384, 48, 384}
RegisterSigningMethod(SigningMethodES384.Alg(), func() SigningMethod {
return SigningMethodES384
})
// ES512
SigningMethodES512 = &SigningMethodECDSA{"ES512", crypto.SHA512, 66, 521}
RegisterSigningMethod(SigningMethodES512.Alg(), func() SigningMethod {
return SigningMethodES512
})
}
func (m *SigningMethodECDSA) Alg() string {
return m.Name
}
// Implements the Verify method from SigningMethod
// For this verify method, key must be an ecdsa.PublicKey struct
func (m *SigningMethodECDSA) Verify(signingString, signature string, key interface{}) error {
var err error
// Decode the signature
var sig []byte
if sig, err = DecodeSegment(signature); err != nil {
return err
}
// Get the key
var ecdsaKey *ecdsa.PublicKey
switch k := key.(type) {
case *ecdsa.PublicKey:
ecdsaKey = k
default:
return ErrInvalidKeyType
}
if len(sig) != 2*m.KeySize {
return ErrECDSAVerification
}
r := big.NewInt(0).SetBytes(sig[:m.KeySize])
s := big.NewInt(0).SetBytes(sig[m.KeySize:])
// Create hasher
if !m.Hash.Available() {
return ErrHashUnavailable
}
hasher := m.Hash.New()
hasher.Write([]byte(signingString))
// Verify the signature
if verifystatus := ecdsa.Verify(ecdsaKey, hasher.Sum(nil), r, s); verifystatus == true {
return nil
} else {
return ErrECDSAVerification
}
}
// Implements the Sign method from SigningMethod
// For this signing method, key must be an ecdsa.PrivateKey struct
func (m *SigningMethodECDSA) Sign(signingString string, key interface{}) (string, error) {
// Get the key
var ecdsaKey *ecdsa.PrivateKey
switch k := key.(type) {
case *ecdsa.PrivateKey:
ecdsaKey = k
default:
return "", ErrInvalidKeyType
}
// Create the hasher
if !m.Hash.Available() {
return "", ErrHashUnavailable
}
hasher := m.Hash.New()
hasher.Write([]byte(signingString))
// Sign the string and return r, s
if r, s, err := ecdsa.Sign(rand.Reader, ecdsaKey, hasher.Sum(nil)); err == nil {
curveBits := ecdsaKey.Curve.Params().BitSize
if m.CurveBits != curveBits {
return "", ErrInvalidKey
}
keyBytes := curveBits / 8
if curveBits%8 > 0 {
keyBytes += 1
}
// We serialize the outpus (r and s) into big-endian byte arrays and pad
// them with zeros on the left to make sure the sizes work out. Both arrays
// must be keyBytes long, and the output must be 2*keyBytes long.
rBytes := r.Bytes()
rBytesPadded := make([]byte, keyBytes)
copy(rBytesPadded[keyBytes-len(rBytes):], rBytes)
sBytes := s.Bytes()
sBytesPadded := make([]byte, keyBytes)
copy(sBytesPadded[keyBytes-len(sBytes):], sBytes)
out := append(rBytesPadded, sBytesPadded...)
return EncodeSegment(out), nil
} else {
return "", err
}
}
package jwt
import (
"crypto/ecdsa"
"crypto/x509"
"encoding/pem"
"errors"
)
var (
ErrNotECPublicKey = errors.New("Key is not a valid ECDSA public key")
ErrNotECPrivateKey = errors.New("Key is not a valid ECDSA private key")
)
// Parse PEM encoded Elliptic Curve Private Key Structure
func ParseECPrivateKeyFromPEM(key []byte) (*ecdsa.PrivateKey, error) {
var err error
// Parse PEM block
var block *pem.Block
if block, _ = pem.Decode(key); block == nil {
return nil, ErrKeyMustBePEMEncoded
}
// Parse the key
var parsedKey interface{}
if parsedKey, err = x509.ParseECPrivateKey(block.Bytes); err != nil {
return nil, err
}
var pkey *ecdsa.PrivateKey
var ok bool
if pkey, ok = parsedKey.(*ecdsa.PrivateKey); !ok {
return nil, ErrNotECPrivateKey
}
return pkey, nil
}
// Parse PEM encoded PKCS1 or PKCS8 public key
func ParseECPublicKeyFromPEM(key []byte) (*ecdsa.PublicKey, error) {
var err error
// Parse PEM block
var block *pem.Block
if block, _ = pem.Decode(key); block == nil {
return nil, ErrKeyMustBePEMEncoded
}
// Parse the key
var parsedKey interface{}
if parsedKey, err = x509.ParsePKIXPublicKey(block.Bytes); err != nil {
if cert, err := x509.ParseCertificate(block.Bytes); err == nil {
parsedKey = cert.PublicKey
} else {
return nil, err
}
}
var pkey *ecdsa.PublicKey
var ok bool
if pkey, ok = parsedKey.(*ecdsa.PublicKey); !ok {
return nil, ErrNotECPublicKey
}
return pkey, nil
}
package jwt
import (
"errors"
)
// Error constants
var (
ErrInvalidKey = errors.New("key is invalid")
ErrInvalidKeyType = errors.New("key is of invalid type")
ErrHashUnavailable = errors.New("the requested hash function is unavailable")
)
// The errors that might occur when parsing and validating a token
const (
ValidationErrorMalformed uint32 = 1 << iota // Token is malformed
ValidationErrorUnverifiable // Token could not be verified because of signing problems
ValidationErrorSignatureInvalid // Signature validation failed
// Standard Claim validation errors
ValidationErrorAudience // AUD validation failed
ValidationErrorExpired // EXP validation failed
ValidationErrorIssuedAt // IAT validation failed
ValidationErrorIssuer // ISS validation failed
ValidationErrorNotValidYet // NBF validation failed
ValidationErrorId // JTI validation failed
ValidationErrorClaimsInvalid // Generic claims validation error
)
// Helper for constructing a ValidationError with a string error message
func NewValidationError(errorText string, errorFlags uint32) *ValidationError {
return &ValidationError{
text: errorText,
Errors: errorFlags,
}
}
// The error from Parse if token is not valid
type ValidationError struct {
Inner error // stores the error returned by external dependencies, i.e.: KeyFunc
Errors uint32 // bitfield. see ValidationError... constants