Commit 988ccf03 authored by Tobias Quathamer's avatar Tobias Quathamer

Update upstream manpages

parent 249a8d3a
......@@ -35,7 +35,7 @@ on the PATH environment variable to find
and some other utilities
.I (tail, chmod, ln, sleep).
.SH "BUGS"
.I bzexe
.I bzexe
attempts to retain the original file attributes on the compressed executable,
but you may have to fix them manually in some cases, using
.I chmod
......
......@@ -15,7 +15,7 @@ bzip2recover \- recovers data from damaged bzip2 files
]
.br
.B bzip2
.RB [ " \-h|--help " ]
.RB [ " \-h|\-\-help " ]
.ll -8
.br
.B bunzip2
......@@ -25,7 +25,7 @@ bzip2recover \- recovers data from damaged bzip2 files
]
.br
.B bunzip2
.RB [ " \-h|--help " ]
.RB [ " \-h|\-\-help " ]
.br
.B bzcat
.RB [ " \-s " ]
......@@ -34,7 +34,7 @@ bzip2recover \- recovers data from damaged bzip2 files
]
.br
.B bzcat
.RB [ " \-h|--help " ]
.RB [ " \-h|\-\-help " ]
.br
.B bzip2recover
.I "filename"
......@@ -247,7 +247,7 @@ Verbose mode -- show the compression ratio for each file processed.
Further \-v's increase the verbosity level, spewing out lots of
information which is primarily of interest for diagnostic purposes.
.TP
.B \-h --help
.B \-h \-\-help
Print a help message and exit.
.TP
.B \-L --license -V --version
......
......@@ -228,7 +228,13 @@ The text of the message with the warning log priority.
.TP
.B segfault
The text of the message that inform about segmentation fault.
.SH EXIT STATUS
.B dmesg
can fail reporting permission denied error. This is usually caused by
.B dmesg_restrict
kernel setting, please see
.BR syslog (2)
for more details.
.SH SEE ALSO
.BR terminal-colors.d (5),
.BR syslogd (8)
......
......@@ -54,6 +54,12 @@ location \fIoffset\fR, and the file will be \fIlength\fR bytes smaller. The opt
\fB\-\-keep\-size\fR may not be specified for the collapse-range operation.
.sp
Available since Linux 3.15 for ext4 (only for extent-based files) and XFS.
.sp
A filesystem may place limitations on the granularity of the operation, in
order to ensure efficient implementation. Typically, offset and len must be a
multiple of the filesystem logical block size, which varies according to the
filesystem type and configuration. If a filesystem has such a requirement,
the operation will fail with the error EINVAL if this requirement is violated.
.TP
.BR \-d , " \-\-dig\-holes"
Detect and dig holes. This makes the file sparse in-place, without using extra
......
'\" t
.TH FIND 1 \" -*- nroff -*-
.SH NAME
find \- search for files in a directory hierarchy
.SH SYNOPSIS
.B find
[\-H] [\-L] [\-P] [\-D debugopts] [\-Olevel] [starting-point...] [expression]
[\-H] [\-L] [\-P] [\-D debugopts] [\-Olevel] [starting-point...\&] [expression]
.SH DESCRIPTION
This manual page
documents the GNU version of
......@@ -14,10 +15,11 @@ searches the directory tree rooted at each given starting-point by
evaluating the given expression from left to right, according to the
rules of precedence (see section OPERATORS), until the outcome is
known (the left hand side is false for \fIand\fR operations, true for
\fIor\fR), at which point
.IR or ),
at which point
.B find
moves on to the next file name. If no starting-point is specified,
`.' is assumed.
`.\&' is assumed.
.PP
If you are using
.B find
......@@ -25,7 +27,8 @@ in an environment where security is important (for example if you are
using it to search directories that are writable by other users), you
should read the `Security Considerations' chapter of the findutils
documentation, which is called \fBFinding Files\fP and comes with
findutils. That document also includes a lot more detail
findutils.
That document also includes a lot more detail
and discussion than this manual page, so you may find it a more useful
source of information.
.SH OPTIONS
......@@ -119,13 +122,16 @@ Do not follow symbolic links, except while processing the command
line arguments. When
.B find
examines or prints information about files, the information used
shall be taken from the properties of the symbolic link itself. The
only exception to this behaviour is when a file specified on the
command line is a symbolic link, and the link can be resolved. For
that situation, the information used is taken from whatever the link
points to (that is, the link is followed). The information about the
link itself is used as a fallback if the file pointed to by the
symbolic link cannot be examined. If
shall be taken from the properties of the symbolic link itself.
The only exception to this behaviour is when a file specified on the
command line is a symbolic link,
and the link can be resolved.
For that situation, the information used is taken from whatever the
link points to
(that is, the link is followed).
The information about the link itself is used as a fallback if the
file pointed to by the symbolic link cannot be examined.
If
.B \-H
is in effect and one of the
paths specified on the command line is a symbolic link to a directory,
......@@ -235,7 +241,8 @@ program tries to minimise such calls.
Show the expression tree in its original and optimised form.
.RE
.IP \-Olevel
Enables query optimisation. The
Enables query optimisation.
The
.B find
program reorders tests to speed up execution while preserving the
overall effect; that is, predicates with side effects are not
......@@ -290,8 +297,8 @@ specific nature of the test (for example,
.B \-type f
is assumed to be more likely to succeed than
.BR "\-type c" ).
The cost-based optimiser is currently being evaluated. If it does
not actually improve the performance of
The cost-based optimiser is currently being evaluated.
If it does not actually improve the performance of
.BR find ,
it will be removed again. Conversely, optimisations that prove to be
reliable, robust and effective may be enabled at lower optimisation
......@@ -420,7 +427,7 @@ and
.B \-iregex
tests which occur later on the command line. To see which regular
expression types are known, use
.B -regextype
.B \-regextype
.BR help .
The Texinfo documentation (see
.B SEE
......@@ -442,15 +449,17 @@ produced, the exit status of
.B find
is not affected. If the POSIXLY_CORRECT environment variable is set,
and
.B \-warn is also used, it is not specified which, if any, warnings will be active.
.B \-warn
is also used, it is not specified which, if any,
warnings will be active.
.SS GLOBAL OPTIONS
Global options always return true.
Global options take effect even for tests which occur earlier on the
command line. To prevent confusion, global options should specified
on the command-line after the list of start points, just before the
first test, positional option or action. If you specify a global
option in some other place,
first test, positional option or action.
If you specify a global option in some other place,
.B find
will issue a warning message explaining that this can be confusing.
......@@ -460,7 +469,8 @@ not the same kind of option as
for example.
.IP \-d
A synonym for \-depth, for compatibility with FreeBSD, NetBSD, MacOS X and OpenBSD.
A synonym for \-depth, for compatibility with FreeBSD, NetBSD, \
MacOS X and OpenBSD.
.IP \-depth
Process each directory's contents before the directory itself. The
......@@ -476,18 +486,31 @@ and exit.
Normally, \fBfind\fR will emit an error message when it fails to stat a file.
If you give this option and a file is deleted between the time \fBfind\fR
reads the name of the file from the directory and the time it tries to stat
the file, no error message will be issued. This also applies to files
or directories whose names are given on the command line. This option takes
effect at the time the command line is read, which means that you cannot search
one part of the filesystem with this option on and part of it with this option
off (if you need to do that, you will need to issue two \fBfind\fR commands
the file, no error message will be issued.
This also applies to files or directories whose names are given on the
command line.
This option takes effect at the time the command line is read,
which means that you cannot search one part of the filesystem with
this option on and part of it with this option off
(if you need to do that, you will need to issue two \fBfind\fR commands
instead, one with the option and one without it).
Furthermore,
.B find
with the
.B \-ignore_readdir_race
option will ignore errors of the
.B \-delete
action in the case the file has disappeared since the parent directory was read:
it will not output an error diagnostic, and the return code of the
.B \-delete
action will be true.
.IP "\-maxdepth \fIlevels\fR"
Descend at most \fIlevels\fR (a non-negative integer) levels of
directories below the starting-points.
.B \-maxdepth 0
means only apply the tests and actions to the starting-points themselves.
means only apply the tests and actions to the starting-points themselves.
.IP "\-mindepth \fIlevels\fR"
Do not apply any tests or actions at levels less than \fIlevels\fR (a
......@@ -511,7 +534,7 @@ subdirectories than their hard link count. This option is needed when
searching filesystems that do not follow the Unix directory-link
convention, such as CD-ROM or MS-DOS filesystems or AFS volume mount
points. Each directory on a normal Unix filesystem has at least 2
hard links: its name and its `.' entry. Additionally, its
hard links: its name and its `.\&' entry. Additionally, its
subdirectories (if any) each have a `..\&' entry linked to that
directory. When
.B find
......@@ -531,7 +554,7 @@ Don't descend directories on other filesystems.
Some tests, for example
.B \-newerXY
and
.BR -samefile ,
.BR \-samefile ,
allow comparison between the file currently being examined and some
reference file specified on the command line. When these tests are
used, the interpretation of the reference file is determined by the
......@@ -575,7 +598,9 @@ option is in effect, the access time of the file it points to is
always used.
.IP "\-atime \fIn\fR"
File was last accessed \fIn\fR*24 hours ago.
File was last accessed
.IR n *24
hours ago.
When find figures out how many 24-hour periods ago the file
was last accessed, any fractional part is ignored, so to match
.B \-atime
......@@ -597,7 +622,9 @@ option is in effect, the status-change time of the file it points
to is always used.
.IP "\-ctime \fIn\fR"
File's status was last changed \fIn\fR*24 hours ago.
File's status was last changed
.IR n *24
hours ago.
See the comments for
.B \-atime
to understand how rounding affects the interpretation of file status
......@@ -628,15 +655,18 @@ succeeds can actually be executed.
Always false.
.IP "\-fstype \fItype\fR"
File is on a filesystem of type \fItype\fR. The valid filesystem
types vary among different versions of Unix; an incomplete list of
File is on a filesystem of type
.IR type .
The valid filesystem types vary among different versions of Unix;
an incomplete list of
filesystem types that are accepted on some version of Unix or another
is: ufs, 4.2, 4.3, nfs, tmp, mfs, S51K, S52K. You can use
.B \-printf
with the %F directive to see the types of your filesystems.
.IP "\-gid \fIn\fR"
File's numeric group ID is \fIn\fR.
File's numeric group ID is
.IR n .
.IP "\-group \fIgname\fR"
File belongs to group \fIgname\fR (numeric group ID allowed).
......@@ -658,11 +688,13 @@ Like
.BR \-name ,
but the match is case insensitive. For example, the
patterns `fo*' and `F??' match the file names `Foo', `FOO', `foo',
`fOo', etc. The pattern `*foo*` will also match a file
called '.foobar'.
`fOo', etc.
The pattern `*foo*` will also match a file called '.foobar'.
.IP "\-inum \fIn\fR"
File has inode number \fIn\fR. It is normally easier to use the
File has inode number
.IR n .
It is normally easier to use the
.B \-samefile
test instead.
......@@ -685,7 +717,8 @@ File has \fIn\fR hard links.
.IP "\-lname \fIpattern\fR"
File is a symbolic link whose contents match shell pattern
\fIpattern\fR. The metacharacters do not treat `/' or `.' specially.
.IR pattern .
The metacharacters do not treat `/' or `.\&' specially.
If the
.B \-L
option or the
......@@ -697,7 +730,9 @@ is broken.
File's data was last modified \fIn\fR minutes ago.
.IP "\-mtime \fIn\fR"
File's data was last modified \fIn\fR*24 hours ago.
File's data was last modified
.IR n *24
hours ago.
See the comments for
.B \-atime
to understand how rounding affects the interpretation of file
......@@ -705,16 +740,19 @@ modification times.
.IP "\-name \fIpattern\fR"
Base of file name (the path with the leading directories removed)
matches shell pattern \fIpattern\fR. Because the leading directories
are removed, the file names considered for a match with
matches shell pattern
.IR pattern .
Because the leading directories are removed,
the file names considered for a match with
.B \-name
will never include a slash, so `\-name a/b' will never match anything
(you probably need to use
.B \-path
instead). A warning is issued if you try to do this, unless the environment variable
POSIXLY_CORRECT is set.
instead).
A warning is issued if you try to do this,
unless the environment variable POSIXLY_CORRECT is set.
The metacharacters (`*', `?',
and `[]') match a `.' at the start of the base name (this is a change
and `[]') match a `.\&' at the start of the base name (this is a change
in findutils-4.2.2; see section STANDARDS CONFORMANCE below). To ignore a
directory and the files under it, use
.BR \-prune ;
......@@ -726,12 +764,14 @@ special, despite the fact that some shells including Bash imbue braces
with a special meaning in shell patterns. The filename matching is
performed with the use of the
.BR fnmatch (3)
library function. Don't forget to enclose the pattern in quotes
in order to protect it from expansion by the shell.
library function.
Don't forget to enclose the pattern in quotes in order to protect it
from expansion by the shell.
.IP "\-newer \fIfile\fR"
File was modified more recently than \fIfile\fR. If \fIfile\fR is a
symbolic link and the
File was modified more recently than
.IR file .
If \fIfile\fR is a symbolic link and the
.B \-H
option or the
.B \-L
......@@ -740,8 +780,9 @@ modification time of the file it points to is always used.
.IP "\-newerXY \fIreference\fR"
Succeeds if timestamp \fIX\fR of the file being considered is newer
than timestamp \fIY\fR of the file \fIreference\fR. The letters
\fIX\fR and \fIY\fR can be any of the following letters:
than timestamp \fIY\fR of the file
.IR reference .
The letters \fIX\fR and \fIY\fR can be any of the following letters:
.TS
ll
......@@ -782,8 +823,10 @@ No group corresponds to file's numeric group ID.
No user corresponds to file's numeric user ID.
.IP "\-path \fIpattern\fR"
File name matches shell pattern \fIpattern\fR. The metacharacters do
not treat `/' or `.' specially; so, for example,
File name matches shell pattern
.IR pattern .
The metacharacters do not treat `/' or `.\&' specially;
so, for example,
.br
.in +1i
find . \-path \(dq./sr*sc\(dq
......@@ -831,7 +874,7 @@ Since an exact match is required, if you want to use this form for
symbolic modes, you may have to specify a rather complex mode string.
For example `\-perm g=w' will only match files which have mode 0020
(that is, ones for which group write permission is the only permission
set). It is more likely that you will want to use the `/' or `-'
set). It is more likely that you will want to use the `/' or `\-'
forms, for example `\-perm \-g=w', which matches any file with group
write permission. See the
.B EXAMPLES
......@@ -841,7 +884,8 @@ section for some illustrative examples.
All of the permission bits \fImode\fR are set for the file.
Symbolic modes are accepted in this form, and this is usually the way
in which you would want to use them. You must specify `u', `g' or `o' if
you use a symbolic mode. See the
you use a symbolic mode.
See the
.B EXAMPLES
section for some illustrative examples.
......@@ -875,10 +919,13 @@ in the client's kernel and so cannot make use of the UID mapping
information held on the server.
.IP "\-regex \fIpattern\fR"
File name matches regular expression \fIpattern\fR. This is a match
on the whole path, not a search. For example, to match a file named
`./fubar3', you can use the regular expression `.*bar.' or `.*b.*3',
but not `f.*r3'. The regular expressions understood by
File name matches regular expression
.IR pattern .
This is a match on the whole path, not a search.
For example, to match a file named `./fubar3',
you can use the regular expression `.*bar.\&' or `.*b.*3',
but not `f.*r3'.
The regular expressions understood by
.B find
are by default Emacs Regular Expressions (except that `.' matches
newline), but this can be changed with the
......@@ -886,7 +933,9 @@ newline), but this can be changed with the
option.
.IP "\-samefile \fIname\fR"
File refers to the same inode as \fIname\fR. When
File refers to the same inode as
.IR name .
When
.B \-L
is in effect, this can include symbolic links.
......@@ -901,11 +950,11 @@ for bytes
.IP `w'
for two-byte words
.IP `k'
for Kibibytes (KiB, units of 1024 bytes)
for kibibytes (KiB, units of 1024 bytes)
.IP `M'
for Mebibytes (MiB, units of 1024 * 1024 = 1048576 bytes)
for mebibytes (MiB, units of 1024 * 1024 = 1\|048\|576 bytes)
.IP `G'
for Gibibytes (GiB, units of 1024 * 1024 * 1024 = 1073741824 bytes)
for gibibytes (GiB, units of 1024 * 1024 * 1024 = 1\|073\|741\|824 bytes)
.RE
.IP
The size does not count indirect blocks, but it does count blocks in
......@@ -919,17 +968,19 @@ differently. The `b' suffix always denotes 512-byte blocks and never
.IP
The + and - prefixes signify greater than and less than, as usual;
i.e., an exact size of \fIn\fR units does not match.
Bear in mind that the size is rounded up to the next unit. Therefore
.BR "\-size \-1M"
Bear in mind that the size is rounded up to the next unit.
Therefore
.B \-size \-1M
is not equivalent to
.BR "\-size \-1048576c".
.BR "\-size \-1\|048\|576c".
The former only matches empty files, the latter matches files from 0 to
1,048,575 bytes.
.IP \-true
Always true.
.IP "\-type \fIc\fR"
File is of type \fIc\fR:
File is of type
.IR c :
.RS
.IP b
block (buffered) special
......@@ -960,7 +1011,8 @@ door (Solaris)
To search for more than one type at once, you can supply the combined list of
type letters separated by a comma `,' (GNU extension).
.IP "\-uid \fIn\fR"
File's numeric user ID is \fIn\fR.
File's numeric user ID is
.IR n .
.IP "\-used \fIn\fR"
File was last accessed \fIn\fR days after its status was last changed.
......@@ -993,7 +1045,9 @@ links: if the
or
.B \-P
option was specified, true if the file is a
link to a file of type \fIc\fR; if the
link to a file of type
.IR c ;
if the
.B \-L
option has been given, true
if \fIc\fR is `l'. In other words, for symbolic links,
......@@ -1002,7 +1056,8 @@ checks the type of the file that
.B \-type
does not check.
.IP "\-context \fIpattern\fR"
(SELinux only) Security context of the file matches glob \fIpattern\fR.
(SELinux only) Security context of the file matches glob
.IR pattern .
.SS ACTIONS
.IP "\-delete\fR"
......@@ -1043,8 +1098,21 @@ and
.B \-delete
together.
Together with the
.B \-ignore_readdir_race
option,
.B find
will ignore errors of the
.B \-delete
action in the case the file has disappeared since the parent directory was
read: it will not output an error diagnostic, and the return code of the
.B \-delete
action will be true.
.IP "\-exec \fIcommand\fR ;"
Execute \fIcommand\fR; true if 0 status is returned. All following
Execute
.IR command ;
true if 0 status is returned. All following
arguments to
.B find
are taken to be arguments to the command until an argument consisting
......@@ -1060,8 +1128,8 @@ section for examples of the use of the
.B \-exec
option. The specified
command is run once for each matched file.
The command is executed in the starting directory. There are
unavoidable security problems surrounding use of the
The command is executed in the starting directory.
There are unavoidable security problems surrounding use of the
.B \-exec
action;
you should use the
......@@ -1129,7 +1197,8 @@ returns a non-zero exit status. If
.B find
encounters an error, this can sometimes cause an
immediate exit, so some pending commands may not be run
at all. The result of the action depends on whether the
at all.
The result of the action depends on whether the
.B +
or the
.B ;
......@@ -1158,7 +1227,9 @@ See the
section for information about how unusual characters in filenames are handled.
.IP "\-fprint \fIfile\fR"
True; print the full file name into file \fIfile\fR. If \fIfile\fR
True; print the full file name into file
.IR file .
If \fIfile\fR
does not exist when \fBfind\fR is run, it is created; if it does
exist, it is truncated. The file names `/dev/stdout' and
`/dev/stderr' are handled specially; they refer to the standard
......@@ -1192,7 +1263,7 @@ section for information about how unusual characters in filenames are handled.
True; list current file in
.B ls \-dils
format on standard output.
The block counts are of 1K blocks, unless the environment variable
The block counts are of 1\ KB blocks, unless the environment variable
POSIXLY_CORRECT is set, in which case 512-byte blocks are used.
See the
.B UNUSUAL FILENAMES
......@@ -1215,10 +1286,11 @@ response. This regular expression is obtained from the system if the
message translations. If the system has no suitable
definition,
.BR find 's
own definition will be used. In either case, the interpretation of
the regular expression itself will be affected by the environment
variables 'LC_CTYPE' (character classes) and 'LC_COLLATE' (character
ranges and equivalence classes).
own definition will be used.
In either case, the interpretation of the regular expression itself
will be affected by the environment variables 'LC_CTYPE'
(character classes) and 'LC_COLLATE' (character ranges and equivalence
classes).
......@@ -1233,7 +1305,8 @@ If the command is run, its standard input is redirected from
.IP \-print
True; print the full file name on the standard output, followed by a
newline. If you are piping the output of
newline.
If you are piping the output of
.B find
into another program and there is the faintest possibility that the files
which you are searching for might contain a newline, then you should
......@@ -1299,11 +1372,12 @@ A literal percent sign.
.IP %a
File's last access time in the format returned by the C `ctime' function.
.IP %A\fIk\fP
File's last access time in the format specified by \fIk\fR, which is
either `@' or a directive for the C `strftime' function. The possible
values for \fIk\fR are listed below; some of them might not be
available on all systems, due to differences in `strftime' between
systems.
File's last access time in the format specified by
.IR k ,
which is either `@' or a directive for the C `strftime' function.
The possible values for \fIk\fR are listed below;
some of them might not be available on all systems,
due to differences in `strftime' between systems.
.RS
.IP @
seconds since Jan.\& 1, 1970, 00:00 GMT, with fractional part.
......@@ -1324,7 +1398,7 @@ locale's AM or PM
.IP r
time, 12-hour (hh:mm:ss [AP]M)
.IP S
Second (00.00 .. 61.00). There is a fractional part.
Second (00.00 \&..\& 61.00). There is a fractional part.
.IP T
time, 24-hour (hh:mm:ss.xxxxxxxxxx)
.IP +
......@@ -1374,7 +1448,7 @@ locale's date representation (mm/dd/yy)
.IP y
last two digits of year (00..99)
.IP Y
year (1970...)
year (1970...\&)
.RE
.IP %b
The amount of disk space used for this file in 512-byte blocks. Since disk
......@@ -1384,7 +1458,8 @@ greater than %s/512, but it can also be smaller if the file is a sparse file.
File's last status change time in the format returned by the C `ctime'
function.
.IP %C\fIk\fP
File's last status change time in the format specified by \fIk\fR,
File's last status change time in the format specified by
.IR k ,
which is the same as for %A.
.IP %d
File's depth in the directory tree; 0 means the file is a starting-point.
......@@ -1409,9 +1484,10 @@ Starting-point under which file was found.
.IP %i
File's inode number (in decimal).
.IP %k
The amount of disk space used for this file in 1K blocks. Since disk space is
allocated in multiples of the filesystem block size this is usually greater
than %s/1024, but it can also be smaller if the file is a sparse file.
The amount of disk space used for this file in 1\ KB blocks.
Since disk space is allocated in multiples of the filesystem block
size this is usually greater than %s/1024,
but it can also be smaller if the file is a sparse file.
.IP %l
Object of symbolic link (empty string if file is not a symbolic link).
.IP %m
......@@ -1419,8 +1495,9 @@ File's permission bits (in octal). This option uses the `traditional'
numbers which most Unix implementations use, but if your particular
implementation uses an unusual ordering of octal permissions bits, you
will see a difference between the actual value of the file's mode and
the output of %m. Normally you will want to have a leading
zero on this number, and to do this, you should use the
the output of %m.
Normally you will want to have a leading zero on this number,
and to do this, you should use the
.B #
flag (as in, for example, `%#m').
.IP %M
......@@ -1441,15 +1518,18 @@ File's sparseness. This is calculated as (BLOCKSIZE*st_blocks /
st_size). The exact value you will get for an ordinary file of a
certain length is system-dependent. However, normally sparse files
will have values less than 1.0, and files which use indirect blocks
may have a value which is greater than 1.0. The value used for
BLOCKSIZE is system-dependent, but is usually 512 bytes. If the file
size is zero, the value printed is undefined. On systems which lack
support for st_blocks, a file's sparseness is assumed to be 1.0.
may have a value which is greater than 1.0.
The value used for BLOCKSIZE is system-dependent, but is usually 512
bytes.
If the file size is zero, the value printed is undefined.
On systems which lack support for st_blocks,
a file's sparseness is assumed to be 1.0.
.IP %t
File's last modification time in the format returned by the C `ctime'
function.
.IP %T\fIk\fP
File's last modification time in the format specified by \fIk\fR,
File's last modification time in the format specified by
.IR k ,
which is the same as for %A.
.IP %u
File's user name, or numeric user ID if the user has no name.
......@@ -1460,7 +1540,8 @@ File's type (like in
.BR "ls \-l" ),
U=unknown type (shouldn't happen)
.IP %Y
File's type (like %y), plus follow symlinks: L=loop, N=nonexistent
File's type (like %y), plus follow symlinks: `L'=loop, `N'=nonexistent, `?' for
any other error when determining the type of the symlink target.
.IP %Z
(SELinux only) file's security context.
.IP "%{ %[ %("
......@@ -1521,8 +1602,9 @@ Any command lines which have been built up with
.B \-execdir \&...\& {} +
will be invoked before
.B find
exits. The exit status may or may not be zero, depending on whether
an error has already occurred.
exits.
The exit status may or may not be zero,
depending on whether an error has already occurred.
.SS OPERATORS
.P
......@@ -1538,7 +1620,9 @@ True if \fIexpr\fR is false. This character will also usually need
protection from interpretation by the shell.
.IP "\-not \fIexpr\fR"
Same as ! \fIexpr\fR, but not POSIX compliant.
Same as !\&
.IR expr ,
but not POSIX compliant.
.IP "\fIexpr1 expr2\fR"
Two expressions in a row are taken to be joined with an
......@@ -1547,10 +1631,13 @@ implied
\fIexpr2\fR is not evaluated if \fIexpr1\fR is false.
.IP "\fIexpr1\fR \-a \fIexpr2\fR"
Same as \fIexpr1 expr2\fR.
Same as
.IR "expr1 expr2" .
.IP "\fIexpr1\fR \-and \fIexpr2\fR"
Same as \fIexpr1 expr2\fR, but not POSIX compliant.
Same as
.IR "expr1 expr2" ,
but not POSIX compliant.
.IP "\fIexpr1\fR \-o \fIexpr2\fR"
Or; \fIexpr2\fR is not evaluated if \fIexpr1\fR is true.
......@@ -1558,12 +1645,15 @@ Or; \fIexpr2\fR is not evaluated if \fIexpr1\fR is true.
.IP "\fIexpr1\fR \-or \fIexpr2\fR"
Same as \fIexpr1\fR
.B \-o
\fIexpr2\fR, but not POSIX compliant.
.IR expr2 ,
but not POSIX compliant.
.IP "\fIexpr1\fR , \fIexpr2\fR"
List; both \fIexpr1\fR and \fIexpr2\fR are always evaluated. The
value of \fIexpr1\fR is discarded; the value of the list is the value
of \fIexpr2\fR. The comma operator can be useful for searching for
of
.IR expr2 .
The comma operator can be useful for searching for
several different types of thing, but traversing the filesystem
hierarchy only once. The
.B \-fprintf
......@@ -1666,11 +1756,12 @@ POSIX conformance of the system's
.BR fnmatch (3)
library function. As of findutils-4.2.2, shell metacharacters
(`*', `?' or `[]' for example) will match a leading `.', because
IEEE PASC interpretation 126 requires this. This is a change from
previous versions of findutils.
IEEE PASC interpretation 126 requires this.
This is a change from previous versions of findutils.
.IP \fB\-type\fR
Supported. POSIX specifies `b', `c', `d', `l', `p', `f' and `s'.
Supported.
POSIX specifies `b', `c', `d', `l', `p', `f' and `s'.
GNU find also supports `D', representing a Door, where the OS provides these.
Furthermore, GNU find allows multiple types to be specified at once in a
comma-separated list.
......@@ -1683,8 +1774,8 @@ When the `POSIXLY_CORRECT' environment variable is set, these patterns
are taken system's definition of a positive (yes) or negative (no)
response. See the system's
documentation for \fBnl_langinfo\fP(3), in particular YESEXPR and
NOEXPR. When `POSIXLY_CORRECT' is not set, the patterns are instead
taken from
NOEXPR.
When `POSIXLY_CORRECT' is not set, the patterns are instead taken from
.BR find 's
own message catalogue.
......@@ -1715,7 +1806,7 @@ The primaries
.BR \-print ,
.BR \-prune ,
.BR \-size ,
.BR \-user
.B \-user
and
.B \-xdev
are all supported.
......@@ -1799,12 +1890,13 @@ other internationalization variables.
The POSIX standard specifies that this variable affects the pattern
matching to be used for the
.B \-name
option. GNU find uses the
option.
GNU find uses the
.BR fnmatch (3)
library function, and so support for `LC_COLLATE' depends on the
system library. This variable also affects the interpretation of
the response to