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Metadata-Version: 1.2
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Name: pytest-xdist
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Version: 1.22.0
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Summary: py.test xdist plugin for distributed testing and loop-on-failing modes
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Home-page: https://github.com/pytest-dev/pytest-xdist
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Author: holger krekel and contributors
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Author-email: pytest-dev@python.org,holger@merlinux.eu
License: MIT
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Description-Content-Type: UNKNOWN
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Description: 
        
        .. image:: http://img.shields.io/pypi/v/pytest-xdist.svg
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            :alt: PyPI version
            :target: https://pypi.python.org/pypi/pytest-xdist
        
        .. image:: https://img.shields.io/pypi/pyversions/pytest-xdist.svg
            :alt: Python versions
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            :target: https://pypi.python.org/pypi/pytest-xdist
        
        .. image:: https://anaconda.org/conda-forge/pytest-xdist/badges/version.svg
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            :alt: Anaconda version
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            :target: https://anaconda.org/conda-forge/pytest-xdist
        
        .. image:: https://travis-ci.org/pytest-dev/pytest-xdist.svg?branch=master
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            :alt: Travis CI build status
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            :target: https://travis-ci.org/pytest-dev/pytest-xdist
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        .. image:: https://ci.appveyor.com/api/projects/status/56eq1a1avd4sdd7e/branch/master?svg=true
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            :alt: AppVeyor build status
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            :target: https://ci.appveyor.com/project/pytestbot/pytest-xdist
        
        xdist: pytest distributed testing plugin
        =========================================
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        The `pytest-xdist`_ plugin extends py.test with some unique
        test execution modes:
        
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        * test run parallelization_: if you have multiple CPUs or hosts you can use
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          those for a combined test run.  This allows to speed up
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          development or to use special resources of `remote machines`_.
        
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        * ``--looponfail``: run your tests repeatedly in a subprocess.  After each run
          py.test waits until a file in your project changes and then re-runs
          the previously failing tests.  This is repeated until all tests pass
          after which again a full run is performed.
        
        * `Multi-Platform`_ coverage: you can specify different Python interpreters
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          or different platforms and run tests in parallel on all of them.
        
        Before running tests remotely, ``py.test`` efficiently "rsyncs" your
        program source code to the remote place.  All test results
        are reported back and displayed to your local terminal.
        You may specify different Python versions and interpreters.
        
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        If you would like to know how pytest-xdist works under the covers, checkout 
        `OVERVIEW <https://github.com/pytest-dev/pytest-xdist/blob/master/OVERVIEW.md>`_.
        
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        Installation
        -----------------------
        
        Install the plugin with::
        
            pip install pytest-xdist
        
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        or use the package in develop/in-place mode with
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        a checkout of the `pytest-xdist repository`_ ::
        
            python setup.py develop
        
        Usage examples
        ---------------------
        
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        .. _parallelization:
        
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        Speed up test runs by sending tests to multiple CPUs
        +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
        
        To send tests to multiple CPUs, type::
        
            py.test -n NUM
        
        Especially for longer running tests or tests requiring
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        a lot of IO this can lead to considerable speed ups. This option can
        also be set to ``auto`` for automatic detection of the number of CPUs.
        
        If a test crashes the interpreter, pytest-xdist will automatically restart
        that slave and report the failure as usual. You can use the
        ``--max-slave-restart`` option to limit the number of slaves that can
        be restarted, or disable restarting altogether using ``--max-slave-restart=0``.
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        Running tests in a Python subprocess
        +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
        
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        To instantiate a python2.5 sub process and send tests to it, you may type::
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            py.test -d --tx popen//python=python2.5
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        This will start a subprocess which is run with the "python2.5"
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        Python interpreter, found in your system binary lookup path.
        
        If you prefix the --tx option value like this::
        
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            --tx 3*popen//python=python2.5
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        then three subprocesses would be created and tests
        will be load-balanced across these three processes.
        
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        .. _boxed:
        
        Running tests in a boxed subprocess
        +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
        
        If you have tests involving C or C++ libraries you might have to deal
        with tests crashing the process.  For this case you may use the boxing
        options::
        
            py.test --boxed
        
        which will run each test in a subprocess and will report if a test
        crashed the process.  You can also combine this option with
        running multiple processes to speed up the test run and use your CPU cores::
        
            py.test -n3 --boxed
        
        this would run 3 testing subprocesses in parallel which each
        create new boxed subprocesses for each test.
        
        
        .. _`remote machines`:
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        Sending tests to remote SSH accounts
        +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
        
        Suppose you have a package ``mypkg`` which contains some
        tests that you can successfully run locally. And you
        have a ssh-reachable machine ``myhost``.  Then
        you can ad-hoc distribute your tests by typing::
        
            py.test -d --tx ssh=myhostpopen --rsyncdir mypkg mypkg
        
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        This will synchronize your :code:`mypkg` package directory
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        to an remote ssh account and then locally collect tests
        and send them to remote places for execution.
        
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        You can specify multiple :code:`--rsyncdir` directories
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        to be sent to the remote side.
        
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        .. note::
        
          For py.test to collect and send tests correctly
          you not only need to make sure all code and tests
          directories are rsynced, but that any test (sub) directory
          also has an :code:`__init__.py` file because internally
          py.test references tests as a fully qualified python
          module path.  **You will otherwise get strange errors**
          during setup of the remote side.
        
        
        You can specify multiple :code:`--rsyncignore` glob patterns
        to be ignored when file are sent to the remote side.
        There are also internal ignores: :code:`.*, *.pyc, *.pyo, *~`
        Those you cannot override using rsyncignore command-line or
        ini-file option(s).
        
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        Sending tests to remote Socket Servers
        +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
        
        Download the single-module `socketserver.py`_ Python program
        and run it like this::
        
            python socketserver.py
        
        It will tell you that it starts listening on the default
        port.  You can now on your home machine specify this
        new socket host with something like this::
        
            py.test -d --tx socket=192.168.1.102:8888 --rsyncdir mypkg mypkg
        
        
        .. _`atonce`:
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        .. _`Multi-Platform`:
        
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        Running tests on many platforms at once
        +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
        
        The basic command to run tests on multiple platforms is::
        
            py.test --dist=each --tx=spec1 --tx=spec2
        
        If you specify a windows host, an OSX host and a Linux
        environment this command will send each tests to all
        platforms - and report back failures from all platforms
        at once.   The specifications strings use the `xspec syntax`_.
        
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        .. _`xspec syntax`: http://codespeak.net/execnet/basics.html#xspec
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        .. _`socketserver.py`: http://bitbucket.org/hpk42/execnet/raw/2af991418160/execnet/script/socketserver.py
        
        .. _`execnet`: http://codespeak.net/execnet
        
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        Identifying the worker process during a test
        +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
        
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        *New in version 1.15.*
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        If you need to determine the identity of a worker process in
        a test or fixture, you may use the ``worker_id`` fixture to do so:
        
        .. code-block:: python
        
            @pytest.fixture()
            def user_account(worker_id):
                """ use a different account in each xdist worker """
                return "account_%s" % worker_id
        
        When ``xdist`` is disabled (running with ``-n0`` for example), then
        ``worker_id`` will return ``"master"``.
        
        Additionally, worker processes have the following environment variables
        defined:
        
        * ``PYTEST_XDIST_WORKER``: the name of the worker, e.g., ``"gw2"``.
        * ``PYTEST_XDIST_WORKER_COUNT``: the total number of workers in this session,
          e.g., ``"4"`` when ``-n 4`` is given in the command-line.
        
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        The information about the worker_id in a test is stored in the TestReport as
        well, under worker_id attribute.
        
        
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        Specifying test exec environments in an ini file
        +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
        
        pytest (since version 2.0) supports ini-style cofiguration.
        You can for example make running with three subprocesses
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        your default like this:
        
        .. code-block:: ini
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            [pytest]
            addopts = -n3
        
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        You can also add default environments like this:
        
        .. code-block:: ini
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            [pytest]
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            addopts = --tx ssh=myhost//python=python2.5 --tx ssh=myhost//python=python3.6
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        and then just type::
        
            py.test --dist=each
        
        to run tests in each of the environments.
        
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        Sending groups of related tests to the same worker
        ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
        
        *New in version 1.19.*
        
        .. note::
            This is an **experimental** feature: the actual functionality will
            likely stay the same, but the CLI might change slightly in future versions.
        
        You can send groups of related tests to the same worker by using the
        ``--dist=loadscope`` option. Tests will be grouped by **module**
        for *test functions* and by **class** for *test methods*.
        
        For example, consider this two test files:
        
        .. code-block:: python
        
            # content of test_container.py
            import pytest
        
            def test_container_startup():
                pass
        
            def test_container_logging():
                pass
        
            @pytest.mark.parametrize('methods', ['ssh', 'http'])
            def test_container_communication(methods):
                pass
        
            # content of test_io.py
            class TestHDF:
        
                def test_listing(self):
                    pass
        
                def test_search(self):
                    pass
        
        
            class TestXML:
        
                def test_listing(self):
                    pass
        
                def test_search(self):
                    pass
        
        
        By executing ``pytest -v --dist=loadscope -n4`` you might get this output
        (sorted by worker for readability)::
        
            ============================= test session starts =============================
            <skip header>
            gw0 [8] / gw1 [8] / gw2 [8] / gw3 [8]
            scheduling tests via LoadScopeScheduling
        
            [gw0] PASSED test_container.py::test_container_communication[http]
            [gw0] PASSED test_container.py::test_container_communication[ssh]
            [gw0] PASSED test_container.py::test_container_logging
            [gw0] PASSED test_container.py::test_container_startup
            [gw1] PASSED test_io.py::TestHDF::test_listing
            [gw1] PASSED test_io.py::TestHDF::test_search
            [gw2] PASSED test_io.py::TestXML::test_listing
            [gw2] PASSED test_io.py::TestXML::test_search
        
            ========================== 8 passed in 0.56 seconds ===========================
        
        As you can see, all test functions from ``test_container.py`` executed on
        the same worker ``gw0``, while the test methods from classes ``TestHDF`` and
        ``TestXML`` executed in workers ``gw1`` and ``gw2`` respectively.
        
        Currently the groupings can't be customized, with grouping by class takes
        priority over grouping by module.
        
        Sending tests to the same worker based on their file
        ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
        
        *New in version 1.21.*
        
        .. note::
            This is an **experimental** feature: the actual functionality will
            likely stay the same, but the CLI might change slightly in future versions.
        
        You can send tests to the same worker grouped by their filename by using the
        ``--dist=loadfile`` option, so tests of the same file are guaranteed to run
        in the same worker.
        
        Using the example in the previous section, all tests from ``test_container.py`` will
        run in the same worker, as well as the tests in ``test_io.py``.
        
        
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        Specifying "rsync" dirs in an ini-file
        +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
        
        In a ``tox.ini`` or ``setup.cfg`` file in your root project directory
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        you may specify directories to include or to exclude in synchronisation:
        
        .. code-block:: ini
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            [pytest]
            rsyncdirs = . mypkg helperpkg
            rsyncignore = .hg
        
        These directory specifications are relative to the directory
        where the configuration file was found.
        
        .. _`pytest-xdist`: http://pypi.python.org/pypi/pytest-xdist
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        .. _`pytest-xdist repository`: https://github.com/pytest-dev/pytest-xdist
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        .. _`pytest`: http://pytest.org
        
Platform: linux
Platform: osx
Platform: win32
Classifier: Development Status :: 5 - Production/Stable
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Classifier: Framework :: Pytest
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Classifier: Intended Audience :: Developers
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Classifier: License :: OSI Approved :: MIT License
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Classifier: Operating System :: POSIX
Classifier: Operating System :: Microsoft :: Windows
Classifier: Operating System :: MacOS :: MacOS X
Classifier: Topic :: Software Development :: Testing
Classifier: Topic :: Software Development :: Quality Assurance
Classifier: Topic :: Utilities
Classifier: Programming Language :: Python
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Classifier: Programming Language :: Python :: 2
Classifier: Programming Language :: Python :: 2.7
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Classifier: Programming Language :: Python :: 3
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Classifier: Programming Language :: Python :: 3.4
Classifier: Programming Language :: Python :: 3.5
Classifier: Programming Language :: Python :: 3.6
Requires-Python: >=2.7, !=3.0.*, !=3.1.*, !=3.2.*, !=3.3.*